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Author Archives: WFHB News

IU Art Museum Director Retires

Adelheid ‘Heidi’ Gealt has announced her retirement as the IU Art Museum Director. Gealt has been director since 1987.

Bruce Cole, Professor Emeritus of Art History and Comparative Literature has been assigned chair of a search committee to recruit a new director.

The new successor will be responsible for upholding the mission of the IU Art Museum to advance the academic goals of IU and enrich the cultural lives of society by preserving and researching original works of art.

A committee of 10 faculty members are interviewing candidates and intend to hire a new director by July 1.

Election Board Struggle With Complex Voter Laws

The Monroe County Election Board struggled with the complexities of election law May 16 as they decided whether to invalidate some ballots cast during the May 6 primary election.

The Board met to consider provisional ballots, which voters cast when poll workers have questions about their eligibility to vote. In one case, County Clerk Linda Robbins said a homeless man voted at the wrong polling place.

William Ellis, a substitute Board member representing the Republican party, said he would like to count the vote. But Ellis said that wasn’t possible because the voter used the wrong ballot, meaning he would have voted in some of the wrong races.

“Being homeless is a hard enough hardship and the vote, if all being equal, I’d be inclined to make this valid,” Ellis says. “It’s hard to prove where you live if you aren’t living anywhere.”

Ellis participated as a Board member even though he plans to run for office in November. Ellis has said he plans to seek the Republican nomination for County Assessor during a caucus this summer.

The Board members were not allowed to look at the provisional ballots they considered. That restriction became an issue when one voter’s paperwork was sealed in an envelope along with the ballot.

The Board voted to rule that ballot invalid. The Board considered some provisional ballots that were cast by voters who did not bring IDs to the polls. Robbins, who opposes the state’s voter ID law, recommended counting one of those ballots.

She said poll workers might not have instructed the voter on how to ensure their vote would be counted after Election Day.

“I do believe the photo ID is a burden for certain individuals,” Robbins says.

Later in the meeting, Robbins said the complex rules for casting provisional ballots are often a source of confusion during elections.

“Filling out a provisional ballot at the polls has been a huge challenge for us,” Robbins says. “It’s very confusing for everybody. Frankly, I’ll commend anybody that has the patience to stay there and must really want to vote to go through that process.”

The Board voted to invalidate two provisional ballots cast at retirement homes. The voters had been registered to vote at previous residences.

Interchange – Ernest Lockridge: The Nostalgia of Emptiness in Raintree County

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Photo Credit: Hugh Hazelrigg

Host Doug Storm ends our three-part series on Bloomington author Ross Lockridge, Jr. and his bestselling novel of 1948 with an interview with Ernest Lockridge, the oldest child of Ross Lockridge, Jr.

In the program Ernest Lockridge discusses his answers to the mystery of his father’s suicide elaborated in his book Skeleton Key to the Suicide of My Father Ross Lockridge, Jr. laying emphasis on what he calls “the culture of pedophilia” of the 1940s Bloomington made prominent by Alfred Kinsey.

Ernest’s brother, Larry Lockridge, strongly opposes this view and offers what he calls a “refutation” to Ernest’s allegations against their grandfather: “Larry Lockridge’s Response to Ernest Lockridge.”

Both brothers have prepared statements as coda to this series of radio programs which offer a kind of “last word” on the subject. Those statements made via email to Interchange Producer Doug Storm follow directly below.

More about Ernest Lockridge, his Skeleton Key to the Suicide, his novels, memoirs, and paintings can be found online here: Paintings of Ernest Lockridge.

The two previous shows in the series:

Interchange – Taking the Measure of Raintree County

Interchange – Larry Lockridge: In the Shade of the Raintree

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Larry Lockridge’s refutation of the allegations made by Ernest Lockridge in his book Skeleton Key to the Suicide of My Father, Ross Lockridge, Jr.

“It wasn’t the lack of evidence, it was the considerable counter-evidence I accumulated during my research for my biography of Ross Lockridge, Jr., Shade of the Raintree, that led me totally to reject my brother Ernest’s theory that childhood sexual abuse of Ross Junior by Ross Senior was the “skeleton key” to the tragedy. I have posted this counter-evidence, some eighteen items, on my brother Ross III’s website, www.raintreecounty.com under “The Biography.” The single piece of counter-evidence people find most convincing concerns an arrangement Ross Junior made with Ross Senior in January of 1947. Ernest was then eight years old and not taking well to the cold weather in Manistee, Michigan where our family was staying. Ross Junior arranged for Ernest to live in Bloomington at his father’s house for four months. The idea was that he would enroll in third grade at Elm Heights elementary school and Ross Senior would teach him recitation. Elsie Lockridge and occasionally Lillian Lockridge would also be in residence, but Ernest and his grandfather would be unsupervised in the large house. If Ross Junior knew that his father had sexually abused himself as a child, would he have put Ernest in such terrible jeopardy? The answer is so emphatically no that this single item is in itself sufficient to discredit Ernest’s entire theory; his key simply doesn’t fit. (With respect to his health, other arrangements could have been made: Ernest could have stayed, as Larry subsequently did, with his mother’s relatives, the Mumbys, within easier walking distance of Elm Heights.)

“I cannot disprove Ernest’s memories of fondling by his grandfather during sleepovers after the suicide of Ross Junior. None of the rest of us encountered such behavior in this grandfather we loved and respected, so these memories are truly shocking. Assuming some truth in them, I suspect Ross Senior’s behavior was yet another bitter consequence of the suicide itself, some totally inappropriate attempt at bonding with the surviving elder grandson by a depressed and guilty person—as parents of suicides usually are. This is an explanation, not an exculpation. It is also a possibility Ernest nowhere considers. It could explain the lack of continuity between Ross Senior’s behavior before the suicide, where I have proved beyond any doubt that there was no sexual abuse, and Ross Senior’s behavior after the suicide as Ernest has described it. Again, the “skeleton key’ Ernest insists on to explaining our father’s suicide doesn’t fit, whatever his own subsequent victimization.”

Larry Lockridge, May 14, 2014, via email to Doug Storm

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Ernest Lockridge Responds:

“Larry posits that grief might have caused a decent man, a Doctor Jekyll, to become a sexual monster, a Mister Hyde, and that this might explain Grandpa’s attack on me on the heels of my father’s suicide. By this logic, Bruce’s drowning years earlier might just as well have caused Grandpa to molest Shockley.

“There was no grief or love propelling the indignant, imperious Mister Hyde who attacked me violently. A predator who had invested so much precious time and energy prepping me was claiming his just reward.

“My sainted father would never have abandoned me to a deviant? Last time I looked this is the same father who abandoned his entire family, the lot of us, wife and four kids, without even acknowledging our existence.

“Embedded in SKELETON KEY TO THE SUICIDE OF MY FATHER is the covert culture of pervasive pedophilia, incest, and childhood sexual abuse, cocooned by institutional protection and denial, and permitted to persist, and to wreak unacknowledged havoc in the lives of innocents. Only now are we recognizing the role of denial and naiveté in perpetuating this plague on humanity. We are also just beginning to acknowledge and understand the leading role incestuous pedophilia plays in the tragedy of suicide.

“Larry’s “counter-evidence” counters nothing; rather, it unwittingly re-inscribes the menu of lethal canards that nourish the pedophile. My brother’s entire argument, the rotting foundation of “the biography,” is an epiphany of denial, a tedious mishmash of naiveté and questionable recall that fails to acknowledge the fiendish wiliness and persistence of the pedophile, and how families close ranks to appease and protect him even as he gluts himself at the family trough. “Grandpa would never have done a thing like that”; “Grandma would never have stood for it”; “but he never did anything to me”; “he’s too old, feeble, harmless” (whereas, pedophiles become “harmless” only after the coffin-lid is nailed down); “it’s a one-off thing”; “‘what we had together’ was unique, my being so special and all.”

“Even Custodians of the Family Honor have a minimal responsibility to bring themselves up to date. Rejecting SKELETON KEY rejects what at long last is becoming factually and irrefutably known regarding the domestic pedophile, his victim, and the deplorable propensity of other family-members to do literally anything to make it all just disappear.

Ernest Lockridge, May 15, 2014, via email to Doug Storm

Bring It On! – May 19, 2014

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Bev Smith and William Hosea welcome Gerrick DeVane, owner and proprietor of Gerrick’s BBQ Catering Company.

PART ONE
Gerrick DeVane, owner and proprietor of Gerrick’s BBQ Catering Company, joins Bev and William on the show to acquaint the listening audience with his new establishment on the corner of 17th and Dunn.

With over 5 years of experience, Gerrick’s specializes in catering graduation events, sports events, birthday parties and cookouts.

PART TWO
Headline news and local calendar events of interest to the African-American community.

CREDITS
Hosts: Bev Smith and William Hosea
Bring It On! is produced by Clarence Boone
Executive Producer Alycin Bektesh
Our News Editor is Michael Nowlin
Our Board Engineer is Chris Martin

bloomingOUT – May 15, 2014

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Authoress of Left-Hander in London-The Earthquake, parent, grandmother, spouse, entrepreneur, writer, entertainer and President of the Indy Rainbow Chamber of Commerce JJ Marie Gufreda is in studio to chat about the upcoming world premiere of her one-woman show to be held in Toronto as well as other potential tour dates and locations.  She also provides some updates about her recent activities and sings a couple of original songs.  Selections are “I’m so Happy, I don’t have the Blues” and “Come to Me Little Ones.” President of Tri-State Alliance Wally Paynter phones in with details about their upcoming 35th Pride Picnic on 8 June in Evansville IN.

www.lefthanderinlondon.org
www.tsagl.org

Producer Carol Fischer
Executive Producer Alycin Bektesh
Associate Producer Sarah Hetrick
News Director Josh Vidrich
Original Theme Music Mikial robertson
Announcer Sarah Hetrick

EcoReport – May 15, 2014

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In today’s EcoReport feature, Matt Reynolds, President of the clothing line Indigenous, discusses the sustainability and eco-friendly practices of the company.

EcoReport is a weekly program providing independent media coverage of environmental and ecological issues with a focus on local, state and regional people, issues, and events in order to foster open discussion of human relationships with nature and the Earth and to encourage you to take personal responsibility for the world in which we live. Each program features timely eco-related headline news, a feature interview or event recording, and a calendar of events of interest to the environmentally conscious.

Anchors: Stephanie Stewart and Dan Young
This week’s news stories were written by Joe Crawford, Linda Greene, Norm Holy, and Dan Young. This week’s feature was engineered by me, Stephanie Stewart. This week’s calendar was compiled by Kristina Wiltsee.
Our broadcast engineer is Dan Withered. Producers for EcoReport are Kelly Miller, Stephanie Stewart, and Dan Young. Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh.

Interchange – Larry Lockridge: An Unedited Interview

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Host Doug Storm talks with Larry Lockridge, author of Shade of the Raintree, about his father Ross Lockridge, Jr., and his bestselling novel of 1948, Raintree County, about the search for answers to the mystery of his father’s suicide, and about the wish to save his father’s letters and manuscripts for future scholars of the novel.

This is an unedited conversation.

Find out more about Larry Lockridge’s Shade of the Raintree at www.raintreecounty.com.

Photo credit: Hugh Hazelrigg

Interchange – Larry Lockridge: In the Shade of the Raintree

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Host Doug Storm continues the three-part series on the bestselling 1948 novel Raintree County with excerpts from a conversation with Larry Lockridge, the second child of Ross Lockridge, Jr., and author of Shade of the Raintree: The Life and Death of Ross Lockridge, Jr.

The episode opens with “Flash Perkins’ Theme” from the soundtrack to the 1957 movie Raintree County.

Listen to the first show in the series: Taking the Measure of Raintree County

More about the novel and Larry Lockridge’s biography can be found at www.raintreecounty.com.

Community Concerned With I-69 Sediment Erosion

A contractor helping supervise I-69 construction insisted May 9 contractors are doing all they can to prevent pollution from the project. In a presentation to the Bloomington/Monroe County Metropolitan Planning Organization’s Policy Committee, Jeremy Kieffner outlined the various strategies contractors use to prevent erosion. Over the past year waterways near Section 4 of the new interstate have been contaminated with sediments washing away from construction areas.

Kieffner works for the Evansville-based firm, Bernardin, Lochmueller & Associates. He told the group road projects always present erosion issues.

Kieffner did not directly address the erosion issues caused by Interstate 69 and he didn’t take questions from the Committee. After the presentation several committee members said they had doubts the state is following proper procedures with the construction. Committee member Andy Ruff has been a long-time opponent of I-69.

“I worked in battling sediment erosion with construction sites and it’s not an easy law to enforce or follow,” Ruff says.

Ruff said the sediment is probably damaging ecosystems in the waterways near Indian Creek, where some of the most contamination has occurred. Committee member Cheryl Munson, who lives in the Indian Creek area, said problems continue there. Munson said she’s hopeful erosion won’t cause as many problems in Section 5 of the interstate, which runs through Bloomington.

Crews have already begun clearing properties in Section 5 in preparation for construction of the interstate.

Bloomington’s 2014 Art Project Grants Awarded

The recipients of the City of Bloomington’s 2014 Art Project Grants have been announced. Grants are made available to nonprofit organizations that participate in activities that revolve around the arts. The purpose of these grants are to support and enhance a high level of artistry around the community. Miya Michaelson, Assistant Economic Development Director for the Arts, talks about this year’s change in how often these grants are given to the community.

“They used to give out grants twice a year and this year was the first time to give out just one a year,” Michaelson says.

Michaelson says the organizations that apply for these grants have increased over the years, and funds have also increased. Additional advertising through news releases, emailing previous applicants with the necessary guidelines, and online allows everyone an equal opportunity to apply.

The grants are given to an organization after considering three categories. Artistic quality, community impact and organization capacity are three factors in deciding who is eligible to receive the grants.

The Arts grant helped established perennial recipients like the Krampus Night activities, and the Bloomington Creative Glass skills pumpkin patch project. There were fifteen recipients for the 2014 grant, the full list can be found online on the city’s art page.

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