Home > Author Archives: WFHB News (page 6)

Author Archives: WFHB News

Daily Local News – August 13, 2015

Play

The Monroe County Community School Corporation is working on a strategy to get voters to renew a supplemental school funding tax. At a work session on Tuesday, the Corporation’s Board of Trustees discussed the logistics of an upcoming referendum vote; Bloomington Mayor Mark Kruzan has joined 35 other Indiana mayors to officially endorse Democratic gubernatorial candidate John Gregg; Lieutenant Governor Sue Ellspermann will serve as the acting governor of Indiana tomorrow while Governor Pence undergoes surgery to have a hernia repaired.

Correction to statement at beginning of the show: the feature interview is with a survivor of a bombing that occurred in Suruc, a Turkish city on the border with Syria.

FEATURE
Today we bring you an extended interview recorded in Istanbul by longtime Bloomington resident and WFHB correspondent Filiz Cicek. Cicek spoke with an activist who had just survived a bombing as he was attempting to cross into the Syrian area of Kobani. Kobani is the name of both a city and a larger area in northern Syria near the border with Turkey. Kobani is also part of Rojava referred to by some as Western Kurdistan. Against the backdrop of the Syrian Civil War, in late 2013 a left-wing revolution took place in Kobani and Rojava. The revolution established a society based on direct democracy, gender equality, and environmental sustainability. Rojava’s government is formed by ethnically inclusive popular assemblies and it has a feminist army of women’s militias that has been key in fighting the Islamic State. Yet less than a year after this revolution, in the fall of 2014, the area came under siege from the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, or ISIL. Most of the city of Kobani was destroyed and much of the population fled to Turkey. However by January the people of Rojava had driven the Islamic state out of Kobani. In late July a group of leftist youth activists from across Turkey travelled to the border near Kobani with the goal of crossing over to help the local people rebuild. On July 20 a bomb was set off during a press conference in the Turkish border town of Suruc, killing at least 32 people and wounding more than 100 more. It is believed that supporters of the Islamic State were behind the attack. WFHB’s correspondent, Filiz Cicek, was able to speak with Ramazan Basar (BAH-sar), a survivor of the bombing. The interview was originally recorded in Turkish and has been translated into English.

CREDITS
Anchors: Carolyn VandeWiele, Scott Weddle
Today’s headlines were written by Joe Crawford
Along with David Murphy for CATSweek, a partnership with Community Access Television Services.
Our feature was produced by Dan Withered; Leyla Keskiner translated the interview and Dan Young voiced the translation
Our engineers are Joe Crawford and Hannah Griggs
Our theme music is provided by the Impossible Shapes.
Executive Producer is Joe Crawford.

EcoReport – August 13, 2015

Play

Later today the Monroe County Solid Waste Management District Board of Directors will discuss the future of Monroe County’s newest recycling facility. Progress on the materials recovery facility, or MRF, has been slowed over the last few of months. Last summer, the Board and the County Council approved the project, which is intended to process the county’s recyclables for sale. A budget of a little over a quarter million dollars was set aside for the project. Later, the county added forty thousand dollars to the budget to cover higher than expected equipment costs. The building, bailers and other equipment have been purchased and the foundation has been laid. However, during recent meetings, the board voted several times against proceeding with some other phases of its development. Today, for our WFHB community report, Assistant News Director David Murphy spoke to three local people who have been involved in the project’s development.

EcoReport is a weekly program providing independent media coverage of environmental and ecological issues with a focus on local, state and regional people, issues, and events in order to foster open discussion of human relationships with nature and the Earth and to encourage you to take personal responsibility for the world in which we live. Each program features timely eco-related headline news, a feature interview or event recording, and a calendar of events of interest to the environmentally conscious.

This week’s news stories were written by Linda Greene, Norm Holy, Joe Crawford and David Murphy. Our Feature was produced by David Murphy. Dan Withered is our broadcast engineer. This week’s calendar was compiled by Filiz Cicek. EcoReport is produced by Filiz Cicek and me, Dan Young. Executive producer is Joe Crawford.

Ellettsville’s Heritage Trail Project Is Well Underway

The formal eastern entrance to Ellettsville’s Heritage Trail is about to be completed. The town’s Utility Superintendent, Michael Farmer, provided an update and description of the work. He stated that some progress has been made in many areas of the trail and that everyone was excited about the completion.

This gateway is for the east-side of the first section of the Trail, that runs from Vine Street, in downtown Ellettsville, north-west for several blocks between East Main Street-Highway 46 and Jacks Defeat Creek, to meet with Main Street. The second phase of the Heritage Trail project is planned to take the Trail north from Main Street to intersect with McNeely Street.

Severe Crop Damage Loans Will Be Available To Indiana Farmers

Earlier today the the U.S. Department of Agriculture approved a formal Disaster Declaration for fifty-three Indiana counties, including Monroe and Brown counties. The request was made by Governor Mike Pence and other state officials in response to Indiana farmers suffering severe crop damage. U.S. Department of Agriculture. Due to record setting rainfall and the resulting floods that began at the beginning of May, many Indiana farmers have lost significant amounts of their crops. Heirloom tomatoes for example, which are ordinarily available in as many as thirty varieties, have been reduced to eight varieties in recent months. Local Farmer’s Market Coordinator Marcia Veldman says Bloomington’s Farmer’s market has been noticeably affected stating that many crops have been simply washed away.

While crop damage is certainly a problem for the local farming market, Veldman says she thinks the situation for farmers will improve in the fall. She says that now that things are looking better, hopefully this will bail out the growing season.

The Secretarial Disaster Declaration will serve to provide low-interest emergency loans to farmers who’ve suffered losses in any of the approved fifty-three counties as well as in contiguous counties. Affected farmers are encouraged to seek details about these emergency loans at the local Farm Service Agency.

Better Beware! – Scamtracker

Play

The Better Business bureau has a cool new feature on their website – an interactive map that shows what scams have been reported from where…all over the world! Here’s a look at how it works for us right here.

Daily Local News – August 12, 2015

Play

A survey out of the Indiana University School of Public Health found youth in Indiana are increasing using electronic cigarettes; Earlier today the the U.S. Department of Agriculture approved a formal Disaster Declaration for fifty-three Indiana counties, including Monroe and Brown counties; The formal eastern entrance to Ellettsville’s Heritage Trail is about to be completed; The Monroe County Board of Zoning Appeals approved two landscaping variances requested by the Cook Group on the Brown School property at 500 West Simpson Chapel Road.

Feature
A professor at the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law has published a book telling the stories of low-wage workers, such as janitors, fry cooks, and health care aides, trying to fight their way to middle-class incomes in Indianapolis. Professor Fran Quigley also writes about the struggles of union organizers with whom he says the workers have found common cause. We’ll hear from Quigley next Tuesday, when he’ll be featured on WFHB’s Interchange, starting at 6 p.m. For today’s WFHB community report, we bring you a conversation with Chalondias Smith, a 66-year-old home health care worker in Indianapolis who will also be featured on Interchange. Smith is a member of the Service Employees International Union. She spoke with Interchange host Doug Storm earlier today.
Interchange host Doug Storm spoke with home health care worker Chalondias Smith of Indianapolis earlier today. Portions of that interview will also be featured on WFHB’s Interchange next Tuesday starting at 6 p.m. Storm will also speak next week with IU law professor Fran Quigley, who has published a book about the struggles of low-wage workers in Indianapolis.

Better Beware!
The Better Business bureau has a cool new feature on their website – an interactive map that shows what scams have been reported from where…all over the world! Here’s a look at how it works for us right here.

CREDITS
Anchors: Araceli Gomez and Kelley Wherley
Today’s headlines were written by Jack Hanek and Joe Crawford
Along with David Murphy and Cleveland Dietz for CATSweek, in partnership with Community Access Television services.
Better Beware was produced by Richard Fish
Our feature was produced by Joe Crawford
Our engineers today are Jim Lang and Matt Gwaltney
Our theme music is provided by the Impossible Shapes.
Executive Producer is Joe Crawford.

An IU Professor’s Upcoming Book Is On Low-Wage Worker’s; A Conversation With A Home Health Care Worker In Indianapolis

Play

A professor at the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law has published a book telling the stories of low-wage workers, such as janitors, fry cooks, and health care aides, trying to fight their way to middle-class incomes in Indianapolis. Professor Fran Quigley also writes about the struggles of union organizers with whom he says the workers have found common cause. We’ll hear from Quigley next Tuesday, when he’ll be featured on WFHB’s Interchange, starting at 6 p.m. For today’s WFHB community report, we bring you a conversation with Chalondias Smith, a 66-year-old home health care worker in Indianapolis who will also be featured on Interchange. Smith is a member of the Service Employees International Union.

Interchange host Doug Storm spoke with home health care worker Chalondias Smith of Indianapolis earlier today. Portions of that interview will also be featured on WFHB’s Interchange next Tuesday starting at 6 p.m. Storm will also speak next week with IU law professor Fran Quigley, who has published a book about the struggles of low-wage workers in Indianapolis.

Electronic Cigarettes Are Popular With Indiana Youth

A survey out of the Indiana University School of Public Health found youth in Indiana are increasingly using electronic cigarettes. The Indiana Youth Survey studied youth in grades 7 through 12. It found e-cigarettes are more popular than traditional tobacco products among that population. About a quarter of 12th graders reported using e-cigarettes, considerably higher than the national average of 17 percent. This is the first year the survey has asked about e-cigarette usage. The higher than average use of electronic cigarettes comes as alcohol and marijuana use among Indiana youth remains lower than the national average.

Standing Room Only – Medicare Turns Fifty

Play

On July 30, 2015, the Indiana chapter of Physicians for a National Health Program and Hoosiers for a Common Sense Health Plan hosted a local event honoring the fiftieth anniversary of Medicare. Dr. Rob Stone, director and founder of Hoosiers for a Common Sense Health Plan, reviewed the history of Medicare and discussed data supporting the need to protect the program and improve it for the future. The event was co-sponsored by Brown Countians for Quality Health Care and The League of Women of Voters of Bloomington and Monroe County. The event was recorded in full by Community Access Television Services (CATS).

Interchange – Keeping a Hand in Mind: Reading and Writing in a Digital World

Play

Should we try to understand reading and writing as primary ways of making a particular kind of human; a way we embody consciousness. Are you “formed” in the forming act? For example, with your hands you made letters and words–you write (not type) a self–you are embodied in the language you craft. Memory lives in the act. Without the act the self subsides and you become the vessel–the clay pot and not the potter.

How does digital mediation affect not only how we read and write, but who we are?

TOPICS DISCUSSED
The physicality of books (smell and touch); the aspect of “possession” of the tangible book as opposed to the ephemeral nature of the digital; children’s use of a pen or pencil to practice writing letters enhances language learning.

RELATED
The Myth of Impoverished Signal” (Naomi Baron on the “Smiley”)

Brain activation patterns resulting from learning letter forms through active self-production and passive observation in young children” by Karin James

GUESTS
Naomi Baron is the author of Always On: Language in an Online and Mobile World and most recently Words Onscreen: The Fate of Reading in a Digital World. She is a Professor of Linguistics and the Executive Director of Center for Teaching, Research and Learning World Languages and Cultures at American University in Washington, D.C.

Karin James is an Associate Professor of Psychology in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, and Director of the The Cognition and Action Neuroimaging Laboratory at Indiana University. Her research program centers around the idea that direct, physical interactions with the environment changes the brain processing that underlies learning, and is important for the acquisition of many cognitive skills.

MUSIC
“Words I Manifest” by Gang Starr
“My Pen and Pad” by Blackalicious
“Kodachrome” by Paul Simon
“Read a Book” by Pylon

CREDITS
Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Joe Crawford
Executive Producer: Joe Crawford

Scroll To Top