Home > Author Archives: WFHB News (page 47)

Author Archives: WFHB News

Daily Local News – January 15, 2015

Play

A second candidate has entered the race for mayor of Bloomington; Poverty is still on the rise in Indiana, according to a new report from the Indiana Institute for Working Families; After a rape was reported on Indiana University’s campus this week, a student group is aiming to educate IU students about sexual assault, rape and consent; The Bloomington City Council spent most of its meeting last night remembering community members who recently passed away.

FEATURE
For a second time, Representative Todd Young authored legislation to increase the number of hours employees have to work in order to receive healthcare from their employers. The bill has passed in the House of Representatives. As it heads now to the senate, WFHB News Director Alycin Bektesh explores what the impact of Representative Young’s bill would be here in his hometown of Bloomington Indiana.

VOICES IN THE STREET
A new year is here, a time for reflection and resolution. How are people in Bloomington resolving to improve themselves and our world? In this special edition of Voices in the Street, WFHB went on-location to local taverns, neighborhood parties, and of course the streets of Bloomington to find all about hopes and dreams for 2015.

CREDITS
Anchors: Scott Weddle, Caroly VandeWiele
Today’s headlines were written by Sarah Panfil
Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, a partnership with Community Access
Television Services.
Our feature was produced by Alycin Bektesh.
Voices in the Street was produced by Kelly Wherley,
Our engineer today is Jonathan Goethals.
Our theme music is provided by the Impossible Shapes.
Editor is Drew Daudelin, Executive Producer is Alycin Bektesh.

Bloomington Beware! – Online Colleges

Play

Up next, our weekly consumer watchdog segment Bloomington Beware!

Daily Local News – January 14, 2015

Play

Governor Mike Pence opened his half-hour State of the State speech last night by saying Indiana has never been stronger; Bloomington residents stood on the corner of Kirkwood and Walnut as the sun set yesterday evening, waving signs that said “no keystone XL” as part of a national day of action against the controversial pipeline; Monroe County is now a semifinalist in a nationwide competition to save energy.

FEATURE
We now bring you condensed portions of Governor Mike Pence’s State of the State address from last night. Pence gave the speech before the Indiana General Assembly.

BLOOMINGTON BEWARE!
Up next, our weekly consumer watchdog segment Bloomington Beware!

CREDITS
Anchors: Kelly Wherley, Kathi Norton
Today’s headlines were written by Alycin Bektesh
Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, in partnership with Community Access Television services
Bloomington Beware was produced by Richard Fish
Our feature was engineered by Michael Hilton
Our engineers today were Jim Lang, Adam Reichle, Matt Gwaltney
Our theme music is provided by the Impossible Shapes
Managing Producer is Joe Crawford
Executive Producer is Alycin Bektesh

Local Activists Turn Out to Oppose The Keystone Pipeline

Play

Bloomington residents stood on the corner of Kirkwood and Walnut as the sun set yesterday evening, waving signs that said “no keystone XL” as part of a national day of action against the controversial pipeline.

Jack Brubaker (BRUE-bay-ker), a local activist who helped organize the event, told WFHB he wants to keep the issue in the public eye, especially because of recent misleading reports that President Obama has resolved not to approve the Keystone XL Pipeline. In fact, the Obama administration announced that he would veto a current proposal for the development due to a procedural hang up. Obama believes the matter should be decided by the state department, not determined through the current legislation. He has not said whether he would veto the project if the state department approves the construction.
Proponents of the pipeline often refer to job creation in the United States, and reduced dependence on foreign oil. Brubaker points out the United States won’t see most of the economic benefits of the project.
Even if the state department approves of the pipeline and Obama signs off on it, it is not a guarantee that the pipeline would be built. A recent drop in the price of oil worldwide means that currently, Alberta tar sand production is operating at a loss, and may not find investors to participate in refining the tar sands.
Brubaker is most troubled by the environmental risks of the pipeline.

Governor Pence Proclaims “Indiana Has Never Been Stronger”

Play

We now bring you a condensed portion of Governor Mike Pence’s State of the State address from last night. Pence gave the speech before the Indiana General Assembly.

Governor Pence’s State of the State Address Receives Criticism

Play

Governor Mike Pence opened his half-hour State of the State speech last night by saying Indiana has never been stronger. For more on this story, we go to WFHB News Director Alycin Bektesh.

Schools, Schools, Schools – a look at the language of the State of the State Address

State of the State 2013-2015
WFHB inserted the text of Governor Mike Pence’s 3 State of the State Addresses into a word-cloud generator – notice any themes?
The full report, tonight on WFHB’s Daily Local news at 5:30pm.

Interchange – Unprotected: On Cybersecurity

Play

Host Doug Storm is joined by David Delaney from the Indiana University Maurer School of Law and Steve Myers from the School of Informatics and Computing to talk about cybersecurity in the public and private sphere.

From the recent hack into Sony Industries ostensibly perpetrated by North Korea to oil pipeline sabotage in Turkey, both our physical places and our digital spaces are vulnerable to almost anyone or any “nation-state” with the right skill-set and knowledge. As guest Steve Myers said, uranium isn’t cheap, but people with computer knowledge are.

Of Related Interest
Interchange – Fred Cate: Government Surveillance, Then and Now
Interchange – Colin Allen: Thinking About Thinking Machines

Credits
Host & Producer: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Social Media: Carissa Barrett
Executive producer: Alycin Bektesh

New Bloomington Directory Highlights Women- And Minority-Owned Businesses

A new business directory is now available to highlight minority and women-owned businesses serving Bloomington and Monroe County.

According to the city of Bloomington, the Minority & Women-Owned Business directory was developed to help provide visibility for diverse businesses, promote equity of economic opportunities, and help eliminate barriers for minority and women-owned businesses.

Bloomington’s minority- and women-owned businesses generate more than $300 million a year, according to census data.

But, according to the city’s press release, minorities and women still remain underrepresented in our county, state and city.

Go here to view the directory in a separate window.

 

Local Legislators Discuss Issues To Be Introduced This Session

Today was the deadline for lawmakers to file bills in the state legislature, and some local representatives are already preparing for a big debate over education funding.

At a forum on January 10, legislators from the Monroe County area said money for schools would be one the biggest issues this legislative session. The officials spoke at a legislative update sponsored by the local League of Women Voters.

State Rep. Matt Pierce (D) whose district includes most of Bloomington said both major political parties agree there should be changes to the formula the state uses to fund public schools.

“You have rural, suburban and urban schools that often have stable or declining enrollments,” Pierce said. “The question is, how will the formula impact those schools? Some schools have more kids from poverty and usually more money is gevn to those schools to help children that may be struggling with things that get in the way of their learning.”

Under the current funding formula, public schools in Gary and Indianapolis receive larger amounts of funding per pupil than most other districts.

Rep. Matt Ubelhor (R) said he expects some conflict over how the formula is changed.

“I think the one thing as Pierce pointed out that’s going to be critical is the funding formula for schools,” Ubelhor says. “In our caucus one child isn’t worth more than another child, no matter where the go to school.”

The two parties are also expected to disagree on how to fund charter schools and school vouchers. Democrats like Pierce have traditionally opposed the trend toward funding those programs, which draw money away from public schools.

While there is disagreement on education, representatives from both parties seemed to agree more closely about funding for criminal justice programs. Last year the legislature made major changes to the criminal code in hopes of diverting some low-level offenders away from prison. Those offenders are instead supposed to be dealt with on a local level, but Pierce said the state has yet to adequately fund those local programs.

“The issue is will the people crafting the budget put money into those programs so we can get them going,” Pierce says. “I’m a little dismayed because the Governor’s budget hasn’t earmarked money for those programs. And, instead, calls for more money to be spent about $51 million to add new prison beds to the Department of Corrections which doesn’t make any sense because we just passed this bill to get people out of there.”

Ubelhor said he also agreed the state should fund the local programs. Officials in the Monroe County government have voiced public concern in recent months about the issue. The County’s Community Corrections Department expects an influx of offenders to its programs.

Monroe County would also be directly affected by another initiative discussed at the legislative update. State Senator Mark Stoops said he plans to file a bill that would help Bloomington Transit expand its services outside the city.

“We hope to make it more of a regional transit system,” Stoops says. “We want to add an income tax to people in the region that would allow Bloomington and Rural transit to provide routes into the rural communities like Smithville, Elletsville and even hopefully Nashville or Bedford.”

Stoops said the expanded service could be useful to commuters and could reduce traffic on local roads.

Scroll To Top