Home > Author Archives: WFHB News (page 42)

Author Archives: WFHB News

EcoReport – November 28, 2013

Play

In today’s EcoReport, Bloomington Urban Forester Lee Huss shares the knowledge he has gained from 30 years of managing the city’s trees and forests- including the need to diversify the types of tree species growing in Bloomington, and the special challenges presented by trying to grow trees in an urban setting.

Around the Table – Episode 2: Food

Play

Episode Two: Food

In this episode of “Around the Table”, listen to hear about the food culture of Bloomington. Around the Table correspondent Nash Hott speaks with local restaurant owners Daniel Orr of Farm Bloomington and David Tallent of Restaurant Tallent. Plus, we hear about your favorite places to dine out in Bloomington, in our Voices in the Street segment.

Around The Table was produced by Nick Tumino and Nash Hott.

Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh.

Our theme music is provided by Deerheart.

Bring It On! – November 25, 2013

Play

Bev Smith, William Hosea, Eric Love, Beverly Calender-Anderson, and Clarence Boone discuss what they are thankful for in a special Thanksgiving Episode.

PART ONE
It’s Thanksgiving week, and before we get too captivated with all the Black Friday and Thanksgiving Day sales, football games, and before we stuff ourselves with turkey and all the trimmings, Bring It On! wanted to take a few moments to share with listeners what they were thankful for during this season.

We  assembled a number of our Bring It On contributors to share for a few moments, those things meaningful moments that they have experienced that are worthy of taking a pause for the cause of giving thanks. Joining Bev and William are contributors Beverly Calender-Anderson, Eric Love, and Clarence Boone.

PART TWO
Headline news and local calendar events of interest to the African-American community.

CREDITS
Hosts: Bev Smith, Clarence Boone, and William Hosea
Bring It On! is produced by Clarence Boone
Executive Producer Alycin Bektesh
Our News Editor is Michael Nowlin
Our Board Engineer is Chris Martin

Daily Local News – November 22, 2013

Play

Bernard Frischer, a professor of Informatics at Indiana University’s School of Informatics, has spent the last five years creating a digital model of the ancient Roman emperor Hadrian’s villa, which is now twenty miles outside of Rome, Italy; The Bloomington Entertainment and Arts District (or BEAD) and Visit Bloomington are recipients of the 2013 Arts Destination Marketing Award, presented by Americans for the Arts and Destination Marketing Association International;Bloomington’s traditional Canopy of Lights Lighting Ceremony will be a week from today on the Courthouse Square. Talisha Coppock, of Downtown Bloomington Inc, says there are a lot of events to attend this holiday season; The Bloomington Commission on Sustainability discussed how the city could start using a new framework for evaluating its livability and sustainability; The Monroe County Council approved grant funding for twenty-one different nonprofit organizations on November 12th; The Richland Bean Blossom School Board voted November 18th to hire a replacement for an assistant superintendent who left suddenly in August. Former assistant superintendent Carol Gardiner left the corporation in August; Monroe County officials made plans November 18th to hire a trapper to kill a population of beavers on the west side of Bloomington

VOLUNTEER CONNECTION
Local organizations scout the listening area for service help on Volunteer Connection, linking YOU to current volunteer opportunities in our community.

CREDITS
Anchors: Roscoe Medlock, Alycin Bektesh
Today’s headlines were written by Lauren Glapa and Yin Yuan,
Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, a partnership with Community Access Television Services.
Volunteer Connection is produced by Wanda Krieger, in partnership with the city of Bloomington Volunteer Network.
Our engineer is Nick Tumino,
Editor is Drew Daudelin,
Executive Producer is Alycin Bektesh.

EcoReport – November 21, 2013

Play

In today’s EcoReport feature, Marcia Veldman, the coordinator for the Bloomington Community Farmer’s Market, tells us about how the market got started in 1975 and gives us insight into the rules of selling.

EcoReport is a weekly program providing independent media coverage of environmental and ecological issues with a focus on local, state and regional people, issues, and events in order to foster open discussion of human relationships with nature and the Earth and to encourage you to take personal responsibility for the world in which we live. Each program features timely eco-related headline news, a feature interview or event recording, and a calendar of events of interest to the environmentally conscious.

Anchors: Trish Kerle and Dan Young.
This week’s news stories were written by Sherry Mitchell-Bruker, Lauren Glapa, Linda Greene, Norm Holy and Stephanie Stewart.
This week’s feature was engineered by Stephanie Stewart.
This week’s calendar was compiled by Kristina Wiltsee.
Our broadcast engineer is Dan Withered.
Producers for EcoReport are Kelly Miller and Dan Young.
Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh.

Howard Zinn: Correcting History

Play

In honor of Howard Zinn scholars and activists from across the country  took part in a read-in of Zinn’s work on campuses across the nation On Tuesday, Nov. 5,  The read-in was organized by members of the IU-Bloomington Progressive Faculty and Staff Caucus. Speakers include Prof. Alex Lichtenstein, Purnima Bose, Sarah Knott, Stepanka Korytova, Isabel Piedmont-Smith. This event was recorded on location in the School of Fine Arts building on the IU-Bloomington campus by Alycin Bektesh for Standing Room Only, on WFHB.

Interchange – Pat Kellar: The Making of Hoagy Carmichael

Play

This week on Interchange, Host Trish Kerle’ speaks with Pat Kellar, producer of a documentary film about the life and music of native Bloomingtonian, Hoagy Carmichael, considered one of the 20th centuries greatest composers of American popular standards.

Kellar talks about the film, Carmichael’s formative years in Bloomington and Indiana University, his early musical influences, his transition from piano player to singer/songwriter, shift from hot jazz to popular music, and his friendships and collaborations with Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, George Gershwin, Johnny Mercer, and Frank Loesser, among others.  Carmichael’s move to NYC in 1929 and, ultimately, to Hollywood to pursue songwriting for the movies, cemented him as not only a musical legend because of hit songs such as Stardust, Skylark, Heart and Soul and the Academy Award winning In the Cool, Cool Cool of the Evening, but because at the peak of his career in the 1940s Hoagy Carmichael had also made his mark as a movie actor, radio star, and published author.

Songs excerpted in the program in the order they are played:

“Georgia on My Mind” – Ray Charles
“Maple Leaf Rag” – Scott Joplin
“Riverboat Shuffle” – Bix Beiderbecke
“Washboard Blues” – Hoagy Carmichael
“Star Dust” – Hoagy Carmichael
“Star Dust” – Isham Jones and His Orchestra
“Rockin’ Chair” – Mildred Bailey
“Lazybones” – Hoagy Carmichael
“Snowball” – Hoagy Carmichael
“Snowball” – Louis Armstrong
“Rockin’ Chair” – Hoagy Carmichael
“Skylark” – Earl Hines featuring Billy Ekstine
“How Little We Know” – Anita Boyer and the Hoagy Carmichael Orchestra
“In the Cool Cool Cool of the Evening” – Hoagy Carmichael
“Can’t Get Indiana Off My Mind” – Kate Smith

Weekend storm swept through the Midwest, see how it affected Bloomington

Play

The wind and rain storm that swept through Indiana, as well as its neighbors to the west and northeast, set records according to the National Weather Service. John Kwiatkowski, Science and Operations Officer in the Indianapolis provided information on the amount of rain that fell during the period, the sustained wind gusts, and tornado activity in south central Indiana.

“People might be surprised that Sunday, the storms were tearing along,” Kwiatkowski said, “A lot depends on where you are, but a lot of rain didn’t fall down in Bloomington area.”

Mr. Kwiatkowski said that the National Weather Service doesn’t record wind speeds as systematically as it does precipitation. However, he did say that 30-40 mph winds occurred in Monroe County, and that the highest recorded in Bloomington was about 40 mph. He also said there may have been winds up to 70 mph in Bloomington, but none were recorded.

There were no confirmed reports to tornado touchdowns in Monroe County. However, the strongest ones reported in Indiana on Sunday were fairly close by, to the southwest and southeast of us, in Daviess and Washington counties, both of which measured at two on the wind force scale. And, Bedford, to our immediate south, registered a EF-one strength tornado.

“We had 26 tornadoes Sunday, and that’s counting the entire state,” Kwiatkowski said, “That’s the second highest daily totaled that’s ever been recorded.
Ian Connor, of the Indiana Department of Homeland Security, told us today that the department is still doing damage assessments for southern Indiana. The department is requesting that individuals go online to the department website at in.gov/dhs and click on the link in the middle of the page titled ‘report damage from severe weather.’

Bloomington Hospital to fire 50 people by end of year

Play

Bloomington Hospital has announced that it will eliminate 50 positions by the end of the year.

A statement, signed by Mark Moore, President & CEO of IU Health Bloomington – the name given to Bloomington Hospital after IU’s takeover – justifies the job cuts in order reduce expenses in order to, quote, prepare for sweeping changes in healthcare.

This announcement comes in the wake of the parent company’s statement in September that it would be cutting 800 jobs across all of its affiliated hospitals. Indiana’s other large hospital group, Saint Vincent’s, announced last June that it had laid off 865 employees.

Accompanying IU health’s September statement on the planned job cuts was a claim that its income for the first six months of 2013 was up 20 percent.

However, IU Health claimed the massive jobs cuts were a necessary response to declining reimbursements and admissions.

These kind of job losses in Indiana hospitals has been predicted in consequence of national events, especially the cuts in Medicare payments to health care providers included in the across-the-board federal spending reductions under Congressional sequestration as well as the planned cuts in Medicare reimbursements under the Affordable Care Act, as it comes into operation.

However, even greater declines in public use of healthcare providers in Indiana was predicted after Indiana Governor Mike Pence chose to not participate in the largely federally financed expansion of  Medicaid under the ACA, which would have provided health care coverage for several hundred thousand more  Hoosiers.

 

Business Outlook Panel Finishes Indiana Tour in Richmond, Expect Economy Growth in Next Year

Play

The 42 annual tour of the business outlook panel wound up its final presentation yesterday in Richmond, Indiana.

The panel is an annual activity of Kelly School of Business. A group of economists and financial experts who get together each year on October to understand the latest trends in the economy and predict where the economy is heading in the year ahead. Experts will also go around the state over the span of the couple of weeks to most of Indiana’s major cities and talk with audiences in those places about how they see economy shaping up.

There are different members of the panel that deal with the global, national and local economy, Director of Indiana Business Research Center Jerry Conover said.

“We always look forward to hearing what the business people and community leaders across the state are thinking,” Conover said.

Conover says they expect 2014 will begin with unimpressive growth and continue job growth. As the year progress in 2014 though, we will expect to see a stronger growth toward the year end. To put that in figure, it is estimated that the overall economy measured in GDP will expand at about 2.5 percent rate.The employment will grow nationally by a little more than 2 million jobs. Unemployment by the end of the year should be down to 6.5 percent nationally.

Conover says the main factors to growth are the continued low interest rates making borrowing affordable for business and propping up higher stock market prices as a result.

“Employers have been increasingly optimistic, though there is still a lot of hesitation,” Conover said, “They’re a little bit more willing to invest in new facilities and to hire staff. They’re not nearly yet to the level they were prior to the recession, but we do see progress coming along.”

According to Conover, Indiana mirrors national economy in many respects though the unemployment has continued to be higher than national average. The most recent figure was 8.1 percent for the state, whereas nationally it’s about 1 percentage point lower.

“We expect for the coming year that unemployment will drop in Indiana, probably somewhere in the upper 6 percent range,” Conover said, “Pay roll jobs will grow by about 55,000 more jobs, and that would be stronger growth than we’ve seen this year.”

Meanwhile, manufacturing continues to be a key factor in creating new jobs in Indiana since the recession. Yet, manufacturing employment and wages are not growing nearly as fast as they had been several years ago.

Conover explains that is because firms during the downturns were able to find ways to make their production more efficient, by improving technology, improving processes that didn’t requires many people to do the job. Once those improvements were made, factories are turning out more products and more dollar value of their output even though they don’t have many employees as they used to.

Conover also adds that employment growing substantially more in nonmanufacturing sector. Healthcare services has been one of the big areas. There has been a lot of job growth in various parts of healthcare sector.

Scroll To Top