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Author Archives: WFHB News

Bring It On! – November 17, 2014

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William Hosea and guest host Doris Sims welcome Eric Love.

PART ONE
On tonight’s show, William and Doris welcome Eric Love for his farewell interview before his departure to the University of Notre Dame after 15 years of service to the IU community.

He first arrived on campus in 1999 and in 2004 became the director of the newly opened Office of Diversity Education since its creation in 2004. He will be working for Notre Dame as their first director of diversity.

PART TWO
Headline news and local calendar events of interest to the African-American community.

CREDITS
Hosts: William Hosea and Doris Sims
Bring It On! is produced by Clarence Boone
Executive Producer Alycin Bektesh
Our News Editor is Michael Nowlin
Our Board Engineer is Chris Martin

Books Unbound – Storytellers of Immortality: World Poetry for Day of the Imprisoned Writer

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Storytellers of Immortality is an episode of contemporary international poetry devoted to courageous writers who have experienced imprisonment, exile, or conditions of repression and violence. The nineteen poets come from Kazakhstan, Tibet, China, Cameroon, Myanmar, Kurdistan, Russia, Chile, Afghanistan, Korea, Iraq, Palestine, Yemen, and Vietnam, and range from a Nobel laureate to a teen blogger. Local guest readers of the English translations are Tony Brewer, Cathi Norton, Eric Rensberger, Frank Buczolich, Berklea Going, Patsy Rahn, Philip Kasper, and Lauren Robert. Also featured are three poetry selections in their original language: Spanish (read by Carlos Bakota), Chinese (Yu-San Lai), and Arabic (Ali Alnahabi), with announcer Sarah Torbeck and host Doug Storm. Written by Cynthia Wolfe.

Hola Bloomington – November 14, 2014

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Los locutores de HOLA Bloomington Maria Auxiliadora Viloria, Luz Lopez y Araceli Gómez-Aldana hablan acerca de la dinámica familiar y las relaciones dentro de nuestras familias Latinas. Ademas, entrevistan a Gaëlle Le Calvez sobre el evento “La política y la violencia en México: Un Foro Público de Información, Solidaridad y Acción.”

Hola Bloomington’s hosts Maria Auxiliadora Viloria, Luz Lopez and Araceli Gómez-Aldana talk about family dynamics and the relationships within their families. Also, they interview Gaëlle Le Calvez about an upcoming event titled “The Politics of Violence in Mexico: A Public Forum for Information, Solidarity, and Action.”

A Fair Day’s Work: Labor Unions

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Bloomingfoods workers will have a union. A large majority of voters were in favor of joining the United Food and Commercial Workers and having this union be the vehicle for negotiating a first collective agreement with Bloomingfoods management. Voices in the Street hit the streets to ask your friends and neighbors how they feel about unions.

Fall leafs and preparing for snow fall

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This mornings’ flurries reminded area residents that winter weather and icy roads are on their way. City of Bloomington Public Works Director Susie Johnson says her department is ready and waiting for winter weather, even if it coincides with the remnants of fall leaf pick-up. She says the trucks still need converted from leaf removal to snow plows, but they are willing and ready if need be.

Johnson and Joe VanDeventer, Director of street operations will be working together throughout the winter to keep an eye on weather forecasts and make the call regarding de icing and plowing streets. This winter, walkers, bikers and other traffic that uses paths other than city roads for transportation will find their route is cleared more quickly that it has been done in the past due to an agreement with a private contractor to take on that portion of the city’s winter storm load. Johnson says the roads are her first priority, but this year a private contractor will be working on the walking paths simultaneously.

A sixty-percent chance of snow showers are predicted for saturday and sunday nights

Griffy Lake deer

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Newly publicized documents are raising questions about a planned deer kill in the Griffy Lake Nature Preserve. Activists opposed to the kill presented information to the Bloomington City Council during public comment last night. The city’s permit to begin sharpshooting deer in the preserve takes effect Saturday. Maria Heslin, a former deputy mayor who opposes the sharpshooting, said she recently obtained a copy of the permit application the city submitted to the state Department of Natural Resources.

The application actually states it will probably take 10 to 20 years of, “sustained management,” for the forest understory to fully recover at Griffy. Proponents of the the cull have cited ecological damage caused by deer overpopulation, although their opponents say there is no proof there are too many deer at Griffy. Heslin said the permit application presents new concerns for those opposed to the cull.

The Council did not respond to Heslin’s questions. They also didn’t discuss a separate document presented by Sandra Shapshay, who has also been a vocal opponent of the kill. Shapshay said a fellow activist filed a public records request to obtain an email sent to Council member Dave Rollo in April of last year. Shapshay said the email came from Indiana University biologist Angie Shelton, whose work has been commonly cited by those in favor of sharpshooting. She says to make an accurate estimate, the pellet count would have to cover the entire Griffy Lake Nature Preserve.

Shapshay said the additional pellet count would have cost $500. The city is paying $31,000 for a private firm to do the sharpshooting this year. Another resident, Hattie Clark, asked the Council to respond to the public’s concerns. She says it seems everyone sits quietly without responding to the important questions.

The Council did not respond. But several Council members did discuss the deer issue earlier in the meeting during the Council comments section. Council member Rollo asked the activists to consider the entire ecosystem in the nature preserve.

Council member Darryl Neher said he plans to be at Griffy when the company, White Buffalo, does the sharpshooting.

Activists have proposed a new ordinance that would put the sharpshooting on hold for two years. But no Council member has introduced that measure for consideration. The cull could begin as soon as this weekend.

 

Right to Work Law

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Last week the Indiana Supreme Court delivered a ruling on Indiana’s controversial Right to Work Law, originally passed by state legislature in 2012. The law makes it a class A misdemeanor to require someone to become or remain a member of a labor organization, or pay dues and fees. The ruling stated that this law did not infringe upon the Indiana Constitution, as claimed by union representatives. Correspondent David Murphy spoke with Indiana University Labor Studies Professor Joe Varga about the ruling and what it means for effective unions for today’s community report.

Daily Local News – November 13, 2014

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This mornings’ flurries reminded area residents that winter weather and icy roads are on their way; Newly publicized documents are raising questions about a planned deer kill in the Griffy Lake Nature Preserve; According to a recent Indiana University press release, Indiana’s exports in 2013 declined after a period of growth in previous years; The City of Bloomington Human Rights Commission is seeking nominations for its annual Human Rights Award; While the midwest is not often associated with seismic activity, it is home to several seismic zones–many of which are active; Scientists Benjamin N. Sulman and Richard P. Phillips in the Department of Biology at IU have developed a new tool to study climate change models.

FEATURE
Last week the Indiana Supreme Court delivered a ruling on Indiana’s controversial Right to Work Law, originally passed by state legislature in 2012. The law makes it a class A misdemeanor to require someone to become or remain a member of a labor organization, or pay dues and fees. The ruling stated that this law did not infringe upon the Indiana Constitution, as claimed by union representatives. Correspondent David Murphy spoke with Indiana University Labor Studies Professor Joe Varga about the ruling and what it means for effective unions for today’s community report.

VOICES IN THE STREET
Bloomingfoods workers will have a union. A large majority of voters were in favor of joining the United Food and Commercial Workers and having this union be the vehicle for negotiating a first collective agreement with Bloomingfoods management. Voices in the Street hit the streets to ask your friends and neighbors how they feel about unions.

CREDITS
Anchors: Carissa Barrett & Scott Weddle
Today’s headlines were written by Taylor Telford, Susan Northleaf, Sarah Panfil, Emily Beck, and Alycin Bektesh Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, a partnership with Community Access Television Services. Our feature was produced by Alycin Bektesh with correspondent David Murphy. Voices in the Street was produced by Kelly Wherley, Our engineer is Jonathan Goethals. Our theme music is provided by the Impossible Shapes. Managing Producer is Joe Crawford. Executive Producer is Alycin Bektesh

EcoReport – November 13, 2014

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In today’s EcoReport feature, Don Hollinger from First Presbyterian Church discusses how the Church accomplished a 90% energy cost reduction through the installation of LED lights.

EcoReport is a weekly program providing independent media coverage of environmental and ecological issues with a focus on local, state and regional people, issues, and events in order to foster open discussion of human relationships with nature and the Earth and to encourage you to take personal responsibility for the world in which we live. Each program features timely eco-related headline news, a feature interview or event recording, and a calendar of events of interest to the environmentally conscious.

Today’s Anchors: Dan Young and Kristina Wiltsee
This week’s news stories were written by Dan Young, Linda Greene, Norm Holy, and Susan Northleaf. This week’s feature was engineered by Dan Withered. This week’s calendar was compiled by Dan Young.
Our broadcast engineer is Dan Withered. Producers for EcoReport are Kelly Miller and Dan Young. Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh.

MCCSC receives report card from state

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Local public schools have received their grades from the state and, while the criteria used by the state for this evaluation have been much criticized, the Monroe County Community School Corporation is quite pleased with the results. The district received an A rating as a whole. Janice Berguson is Director of Secondary School for MCCSC, with responsibility for overseeing the school district’s response to the grades. She provides a breakdown of the individual school grades this year as well as last year’s in comparison.

Last year’s two F’s were given to Fairview and Highland Park elementary schools. This year Highland Park got a B while Fairview got another F, for the third year in a row. Following Fairview’s second F, the school’s administrators announced to the students that teachers, classes and programs would be substantially changed. When the parents found out, many responded by demanding cancellation of these changes and asked to be involved in developing any reform plans. This was followed by the appointment of a new principal from the Indianapolis school system.  Berguson explains Fairview’s current track upon receiving yet another failing grade.

The state grading of schools is based on the collective summary of the performance of all the students in each school on the state mandated and administered ISTEP examinations. ISTEP exams are given to students each Spring. All students in grades 3 through 8 plus high school sophomores complete tests on-line in language arts and math. Additionally, students in grades 4 and 6 are tested in science, and students in grades 5 and 7 are tested in social studies. The test consists of two components: a written test, usually in March, and a multiple-choice test over the same subjects in April. Students are graded “did not pass”, “pass”, or “pass plus.” The cumulative results for particular schools are to be used by school administrators in determining pay, promotion, demotion and termination of teachers. The system has been controversial, with members of both political parties speaking out against it. The high stakes nature of the school evaluation process, the very narrow range of ISTEP indicators have been the source of criticism of both ISTEP and the A to F school grading program from educators, parents and experts on student evaluation.

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