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Author Archives: WFHB News

Bring It On! – January 27, 2014

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Bev Smith and William Hosea welcome guest Guy Loftman, along with BIO contributor Cornelius Wright.

PART ONE
Back on November 5, 2013, the public was invited to explore alternatives to the war on drugs. The event, co-sponsored by the Monroe County Branch of the NAACP, gave a prevailing thought that there is much evidence that the War on Drugs is, at least in effect, a war on Black males, as shown in the book “The New Jim Crow”, by Michelle Alexander.

Joining Bev and William are Local Bloomington Attorney Guy Loftman, is a member of the Legal Redress Committee of the Monroe County Branch of the NAACP,  and Bring It On! contributor Cornelius Wright to share in a discussion on how damaging illegal drug usage is on black males.

PART TWO
Headline news and local calendar events of interest to the African-American community.

CREDITS
Hosts: Bev Smith and William Hosea
Bring It On! is produced by Clarence Boone
Executive Producer Alycin Bektesh
Our News Editor is Michael Nowlin
Our Board Engineer is Chris Martin

Daily Local News – January 24th, 2014

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During the sub-zero temperatures this winter, the City of Bloomington is reminding residents to insulate pipes and to let water flow through faucets, to help prevent water lines from freezing; The Bloomington City Council heard from residents on Wednesday who are frustrated with Governor Mike Pence’s refusal to expand Medicaid in Indiana; With the proposition for a higher minimum wage in Indiana, a lot of questions have been raised regarding who will be affected by it, who will benefit, and how businesses will be affected by the wage hike.

FEATURE
“Your Love is True”
Last night, the second annual Celebration of Love – a marriage ceremony officiated by Bloomington Mayor Mark Kruzan celebrating same sex couples – was held at the closing of the first day of the PRIDE Film Festival at the Buskirk Chumley Theater.

CREDITS
Anchors: Helen Harrell, Nick Tumino
Today’s headlines were written by Chelsea Hardy,
Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, a partnership with Community Access Television Services.
Our feature was produced by Alycin Bektesh, with correspondent Sarah Hetrick.
Volunteer Connection is produced by Wanda Krieger, in partnership with the city of Bloomington Volunteer Network.
Our theme music is provided by the Impossible Shapes.
Our engineer and editor is Drew Daudelin,
Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh.

 

 

HJR-3 Advances Through The Indiana House

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This morning the Indiana House of Representatives adopted the committee report from yesterday’s Elections and Apportionment Committee meeting, during which House Joint Resolution 3 passed, 9 to 3.

The proposed amendment to the Indiana constitution, which explicitly states that same sex couples do not have the right to get married, may now continue through the legislative process, and is expected to have a second reading before the House on Monday.

District 61 Representative Matt Pierce spoke on the floor today during the adoption, warning that the unprecedented process in which the bill came to the house floor would set a precedent for future speakers of the house to rearrange the legislative process to get the outcome they are looking for, just as House Speaker Brian Bosma reassigned HJR-3 once it fell short in the Judiciary committee.

“I made the argument that what the speaker had done was unprecedented,” Pierce said, “It was like a golfer taking a mulligan when they get their resolution stuck in the sand trap. It created a system where you can just have a do-over until you get the result you want. What the speaker did that was so unique is that he actually had a bill in a judiciary committee, the public testimony was taken, the committee had been educated on the issue, they were at the point where a vote could be taken and they obviously delayed it because they knew it wasn’t going to come out the way they wanted it to. For the speaker to then take the bill away from the judiciary committee and put it into elections, where clearly he had counted his votes to know he’d get a good reaction, is what is unprecedented. I ask for the members in the house to reject the committee report to essentially say we don’t want to set the precedent of having these mulligans going on every time we have a controversial bill. It did not work.”

House Representative and Elections and Apportionment committee member Woody Burton, District 58 is quoted in the Indianapolis Star acknowledging that there is a divide between the younger and older Republican members of the house and their views towards marriage equality, but a sister bill introduced this month may be a way of modifying the original bill to retain the vote of the more tolerant Republicans.

House Bill 1153 explains away a sentence regarding civil unions in the original resolution without actually making changes that would force the process back to square one, because the amendment can only be sent to a referendum if it is passed twice with the exact same language by two different assemblies.

Pierce says the companion bill brought additional challenges, rather than solutions.

“That bill actually catalogued all the potential unintentional consequences of that amendment,” Pierce said, “I think they thought that by listing them, that would be kind of like a lifeboat that a lot of republicans could put themselves in and feel safe enough to go ahead and vote for the amendment as is. What I think what happened instead is that after they heard from some legal experts explaining how it was unprecedented, that backfired and caused some members of the judiciary committee to decide they wouldn’t vote for it.”

Similar bills in nearby states have been ruled unconstitutional–most recently a federal judge in Ohio ruled their gay marriage ban as such.

Pierce says that when issues of discrimination and legality come up, proponents of HJR-3 claim that the decision is not theirs to make.

“Oftentimes issues come up asking is this bill constitutional?” Pierce said, “The truth of the matter is that since it’s a joint resolution amending the constitution, it automatically becomes constitutional once it becomes part of the constitution. The real issue is whether or not it’s unconstitutional under the federal constitution. The attitude of most members when that comes up is that they can come up with their own ideas of what’s constitutional or not, and that I will decide what’s the best policy and it’s the job of the court to decide whether the ruling is unconstitutional.”

When HJR-3 is brought to the House Floor, most likely on Monday, any Representative can offer amendments to the bill.  Amendments must have a majority of favorable votes to become adopted but with Republicans holding a super majority it is unlikely that any amendment offered by a democratic representative would pass.

Additionally, if HJR-3 is made too dissimilar to 2011’s HJR-6, it would not qualify for referendum this year. Pierce says the democrats are working on their strategy over the weekend, and have until two hours prior to the House Chamber meeting to offer amendments to be read on the house floor on Monday.

bloomingOUT – January 23, 2014

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New Cell Tower To Be Built Near Bloomington

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The Monroe County Plan Commission gave its approval January 21 to a company seeking to build a new cell tower southwest of Bloomington.

County Planner Jackie Scanlan told the commission there are no other towers near the proposed site, which is on East Lane, just west of State Road 37.

Scanlan responded to a question from commission member Scott Wells.

“The consultant report said that the closest is at least two miles away,” Scanlan said.

County zoning law does not allow cell towers to be built within a mile of another tower. The county ordinance also requires co-location, meaning a given tower should be made available to multiple companies to use.

Wells praised the county’s rules, saying that they limit the proliferation of towers throughout the county.

“What’s so good about our ordinance is that if you go up to Morgan county, right in the middle of the county you’ll see three separate towers, and I’m glad we have the potential to eliminate the clutter,” Wells said.

Jennifer Jones spoke on behalf of JB Towers, the company seeking to build the new 190 feet tower.

Jones said the county’s ordinance limits competition in the area, which will benefit her Fort Wayne-based company.

“Something unique about our company is that we don’t work specifically for any one cell phone company,” Jones said, “We own the tower ourselves and it’s our business plan to co-locate the towers.”

The project requires a variance from the county ordinance, because it is closer than 200 feet from the property line.

Commission member John Irvine said the county should rethink that part of its law, which is intended to prevent a tower from damaging another piece of property if it falls.

After the discussion, the commission voted unanimously, in support of rezoning the property to accommodate the new tower.

Tips To Safely Deal With Winter Weather

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The Indiana Department of Environmental Management, or IDEM, has issued a press release detailing ways to deal with winter weather while staying safe and environmentally friendly.

If you use chemical salts to melt ice off your sidewalk, be sure not to over apply or allow the salts to fall on your lawn or garden, since excess salts can be damaging to flora.

If you spread sand for traction, don’t overuse it either, as that excessive material can cause problems in storm water systems.

You can winterize your vehicle by checking your air filter and fluid levels, checking tires for tread wear and proper inflation, and checking the condition of your windshield wipers.

Ensuring your vehicle is ready for weather changes will reduce damage, which prevents waste from broken parts, and will keep you safe on the road.

Make sure your heating system is operating efficiently. It is a good idea to have a contractor perform a routine check-up and any necessary maintenance on the equipment before freezing weather drives up your energy bill.

Daily Local News – January 23, 2014

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Due to anticipated below zero temperatures, the City of Bloomington has announced that Sanitation Department services are suspended tomorrow, January 24th; This morning the Indiana House of Representatives adopted the committee report from yesterday’s Elections and Apportionment Committee meeting, during which House Joint Resolution 3 was passed nine to three; The Monroe County Plan Commission gave its approval January 21st to a company seeking to build a new cell tower southwest of Bloomington; The Indiana Department of Environmental Management, or IDEM, has issued a press release detailing ways to deal with winter weather while staying safe and environmentally friendly.

Feature
Pride Film Fest Co-Director on Upcoming Scheduled Pride Events
The 11th Annual Bloomington Pride Film Festival takes place tonight, Saturday, and Sunday at the Buskirk Chumley Theater. Its films will explore a wide variety of issues and situations involving gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and queer communities. The weekend-long festival also includes live performances, a dance party, and a mass LGBTQ wedding. Correspondent Lauren Glapa spoke with co-director Sarah Perfetti about the festival for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

VOICES IN THE STREET
Our weekly public opinion feature Voices in the Street asks you about racial equality in America, and how far you think we’ve come since Martin Luther King Jr. gave his “I Have a Dream” speech in 1963.

CREDITS
Anchors: Carolyn VandeWiele, Scott Weddle
Today’s headlines were written by Alycin Bektesh and Drew Daudelin,
Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, a partnership with Community Access Television Services.
Our feature was produced by Lauren Glapa.
Voices in the Street was produced by Kelly Wherley,
Our engineer today is Sarah Hettrick.
Our theme music is provided by the Impossible Shapes.
Editor is Drew Daudelin,
Executive Producer is Alycin Bektesh.

EcoReport – January 23, 2014

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In today’s EcoReport feature, Kim Ferraro, Water and Agricultural Policy Director for the Hoosier Environmental Council, talks about the ag-gag or anti-whistleblower bill currently before the Indiana legislature, as well as several other proposed state laws that are troubling to Indiana environmentalists.

Anchors: Stephanie Stewart and Dan Young
EcoReport is a weekly program providing independent media coverage of environmental and ecological issues with a focus on local, state and regional people, issues, and events in order to foster open discussion of human relationships with nature and the Earth and to encourage you to take personal responsibility for the world in which we live. Each program features timely eco-related headline news, a feature interview or event recording, and a calendar of events of interest to the environmentally conscious.

This week’s news stories were written by Linda Greene,  Dan Young, and Norm Holy. This week’s feature was engineered by Dan Young. This week’s calendar was compiled by Kristina Wiltsee. Our broadcast engineer is Dan Withered. Producers for EcoReport are Dan Young and Dan Young. Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh

Interchange – Utopia: Ideas into Action

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In this episode of Interchange, host Doug Storm goes in search of No Place, or what Thomas More, the 16th century lawyer and statesman, and originator of the term (if not the literary genre), called Utopia. Providing map and compass (moral and otherwise) are Constance Furey, associate professor in the department of Religious Studies and a scholar of the Renaissance and Reformation Christianity, and Shelby Everett, a junior at Indiana University working towards a degree in Religious Studies who is currently interning with Fair Trade Bloomington.

Interview highlight: Constance Furey on utopian thinking as “educating desire”

“Though it’s often talked about as a kind of blueprint, and that’s one of the reasons that Plato’s Republic is invoked as a precedent also for a seemingly totalitarian vision of society, I think it’s actually helpful to imagine utopia more as a way of thinking about how to educate desire….Those desires are not in fact consistent or uniform across cultures, across time, between people, and so there’s a sense that what we do is going to be shaped by what it is we think we want and that’s where the ideal comes in and I think utopia is one of these ways of saying, and confronting us, ‘What do you want? What looks good to you?’…and therefore the implicit question potentially becomes explicit, ‘Why does that look good to you?’ And that’s a way of shaping or influencing desire…”

Works and authors discussed in this podcast:

Thomas More (1478 – 6 July 1535), Utopia

Plato, The Republic

Christine de Pizan (1364 – c. 1430), The Book of the City of Ladies

Emilia Laneir (1569-1645), Salve Deus Rex Iudæorum(containing “Eve’s Apology”)

Nathan Schneider, Thank You, Anarchy

Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1860 – 1935): “Yellow Wallpaper”; Herland

Shooting at Purdue University leaves one dead and one suspect in custody

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Purdue University officials confirmed today that one man was fatally shot and one suspect was taken into custody following a shooting that occurred on campus around noon.

The suspect in custody has been identified as 23-year-old Cody Cousins and the shooting victim as 21-year-old Andrew Boldt, Purdue senior and teaching assistant. Police say Cousins had a prior criminal record.

Following initial reports of the incident, a “shelter in place” directive was issued for the West Lafayette campus.

The order was lifted by 1:15 pm. A university spokesperson confirmed that there were no other suspects.

Classes were then suspended for the remainder of the day as well as all day Wednesday.

Counselling services were also set up to be offered to students in the wake of a fatal shooting.

“Today’s shooting at Purdue University is a tragedy, and our heartfelt condolences go out to the family of the victim and to everyone in the Purdue community,” Gov. Mike Pence said in a statement. “I commend the professionalism of the West Lafayette Police Department in apprehending the suspect and bringing the situation to a swift conclusion. The Indiana State Police are on the scene and will continue to assist local law enforcement with the ongoing investigation.”

A candlelight vigil is scheduled for 8 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 21, near the Engineering Fountain.

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