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Author Archives: WFHB News

Interchange – Shadows Are Black: Slavery’s Long Setting

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Tonight’s show, Shadows are Black: Slavery’s Long Setting, features a discussion on the text and context of Herman Melville’s 1855 novella “Benito Cereno.” “Benito Cereno” is clearly about slavery; but it also seems a deep meditation on the limits of the mind; on the ignorance of other ways to be minded; on the commonality of humanness (for “good” or “bad”). It is about America, it is about Spain, it is about Africa, and it is about cultural blindness and interpretive misconstrual. The stage setting is borrowed from Spain, the actors are nearly all African, and the play we’re watching turns out to be “The Ignorant American,” and the director is Babo.

Guests

Maisha Wester, an Associate Professor in Indiana University’s Department of African American and African Diaspora Studies, and author of African American Gothic: Screams from Shadowed Places.

Christopher Freeburg, an Associate Professor of English at the University of Illinois, and author of Melville and the Idea of Blackness: Race and Imperialism in Nineteenth Century America.

Related

Books Unbound – “Benito Cereno” by Herman Melville

Books Unbound – “Benito Cereno” by Herman Melville, Part Two

Books Unbound – “Benito Cereno” by Herman Melville, Part Three

Credits

Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Social Media: Carissa Barrett
Executive Producer: Joe Crawford

Bloomington Plan Commission Approves New Hotel Downtown

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A new hotel seems headed to the heart of downtown Bloomington. Last night the city Plan Commission approved plans for a 146-room hotel known as the Graduate.

The hotel is planned for the corner of Kirkwood Avenue and Lincoln Street. Currently the Old National Bank is on that site, but there are plans for the bank to build a new branch just down the street.

There was more than an hour of public comment before the Plan Commission held its vote.

Many residents were upset about the size of the 70-foot-tall hotel. Others were upset about the loss of the parking lot at Old National Bank.

The bank currently allows some churches to use its lot outside of business hours.

Daily Local News – February 10, 2015

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Governor Mike Pence has signed an executive order to shorten the length of the 2015 ISTEP+ test; Local peace groups are sponsoring an event tomorrow covering the United States relationship with Iran; A new hotel seems headed to the heart of downtown Bloomington;

FEATURE
In the wake of the recent attacks on the French magazine Charlie Hebdo as well as continued fighting the group known as ISIS, there has been increased scrutiny of Islam in American media. Last night WFHB correspondent Sophia Saliby was on hand for a local conversation about Islam.

INS AND OUTS OF MONEY
Stephanie Solomon, from Mother Hubbard’s cupboard, talks to Ryan Stacy about jumpstarting the garden season in February and growing your own food.

CREDITS
Today’s headlines were written by David Murphy, Sophia Saliby and Joe Crawford
Our feature was produced by Sophia Saliby and edited by Joe Crawford
The Ins and Outs of Money is produced by Ryan Stacy and edited by Dan Withered, in partnership with the Monroe County Public Library and The United Way of Monroe County.
Our engineer is Joe Crawford
Our theme music is provided by the Impossible Shapes.
Managing Producer is Alycin Bektesh
Executive Producer is Joe Crawford.

Gov. Pence Promises To Shorten ISTEP+ Assessment

by David Murphy Governor Mike Pence has signed an executive order to shorten the length of the 2015 ISTEP+, which is scheduled to be administered in March.

The order is Pence’s response to the uproar that followed last week’s announcement that this year’s tests would take more than twice as much time for students to take as they did last year.The average time is up from around 5 hours to around 12 hours.

Pence’s proposal would only take effect after the appointment of a so-called assessment expert and a presentation of the ensuing report to the State Board of Education and the Department of Education. Today, Pence’s office announced that he had named Edward Roeber, a private sector testing consultant, to carry out his wishes.

This flap over I-STEP+ is only the latest in a long line of problems and complaints the test has caused since its inception. Since teacher pay and promotion is increasingly based on the performance of students on the tests, many say there is increased pressure to ‘teach-to-the-test.’

Some teachers now prefer teaching in schools and districts where higher socio-economic conditions tend to boost test scores. At the other end of the spectrum, poorer schools and districts, which produce lower test results, are put on track for eventual privatization. The most recent estimate is that the state department of education paid outside firms and consultants $31 million for the tests.

At the local level, the Monroe County Community School Corporation had to add five days to the school calendar year just to administer the test when it was originally introduced. On top of that administrative cost is the supplemental time and cost of test preparation, pre-testing, and test processing.

Last year, the test practice time was about an hour. This year it has grown to six hours.

Other problems have arisen in the actual application of the tests, including computer glitches during tests, errors in score calculation, and even the fudging of results, the most notorious being when former state superintendent of education, Tony Bennett, was caught raising the score of a charter school run by a big GOP donor. ISTEP + testing begins next month in Monroe County and across the state.

Bring It On! – February 9, 2015

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Clarence Boone and Leila Randle welcome Mike Diekhoff.

PART ONE
On tonight’s show, Clarence and Leila welcome Bloomington Police Chief Mike Diekhoff. He joins us to share his perspectives on how the BPD is making Bloomington a safe place to live, work and thrive.

PART TWO
Headline news and local calendar events of interest to the African-American community.

CREDITS
Hosts: Clarence Boone and Leila Randle
Bring It On! is produced by Clarence Boone
Executive Producer Joe Crawford
Our News Editor is Michael Nowlin
Our Board Engineer is Chris Martin

Books Unbound – “Benito Cereno” by Herman Melville, Part Three

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“Benito Cereno” is based on the memoir of the real-life Captain Amasa Delano, who during his voyages in 1805 came upon a Spanish merchant-ship in distress. Melville preserves the main elements of the story—the ship is manned by a skeleton crew of Spaniards under the haggard and enigmatic captain Benito Cereno, and carries Africans for the slave trade—but provokes interpretation by altering some historical facts. He sets the story in 1799, and renames the ship San Dominick. In this and other details, Melville evokes the Haitian Revolution of 1791–1804 in the French colony of Saint-Domingue.

Haiti is the only republic founded as the result of a slave revolt. But white Americans, despite their own revolution only a couple of decades earlier, sided against black Haitians fighting for freedom, and feared that slave revolts would spread throughout the Caribbean and into the slavery-based southern United States. Melville’s story captures this unease.

In the third of a four-part program, Captain Delano finally discovers the true nature of the enclosed society on board the San Dominick. The painstaking interiority of the first half of the story switches abruptly to violent action.

This episode features guest Maisha Wester, an associate professor at Indiana University and author of African American Gothic: Screams from Shadowed Places. Wester discusses the Haitian Revolution as background to Melville’s story, and Babo as a figuration of the white inability to “read” the black slave.

The episode was produced by Doug Storm and Cynthia Wolfe with Sarah Torbeck, and written by Cynthia Wolfe with Doug Storm, who is the reader and interviewer. Special music comes from River of Light by Richard Danielpour, as recorded by Tim Fain and Pei-Yao Wang.

Announcer: Berklea Going
Host: Sarah Torbeck
Theme music: The Impossible Shapes

bloomingOUT – February 5, 2015

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Tonight, hosts Jeff Poling and Ryne Shadday discuss America’s view of the gender spectrum and sexuality as a whole, as well as some ways we can continue to cut down on the amount of homeless LGBT youth in the community. Host Jeff Jewel interviewed guest Laura Ingram of Prism Youth. If you would like more information about Prism Youth, you may email Laura at prismyouthcommunity@gmail.com or visit them on Facebook at Prism Youth Community – Bloomington. We also heard a weekly segment of Out on Campus, discussing the relationship between being LGBT and being religious with Arielle Soussan. Our other weekly segment, First Year Out featured Nick Tumino talking with friend, Brice, about finding a community, in Bloomington and elsewhere, social media norms, dating on social media, and self-confidence issues stemming from social media. The bloomingOUT team would like to give special thanks to our guest Laura Ingram.

Credits
Hosts Ryne Shadday, Jeff Poling, Jeff Jewel
Executive Producer Joe Crawford
Producer Olivia Davidson
Script Coordinator Hayley Bass
Board Engineer Carissa Barrett

Voices in the Street – “Backing or Attacking the Anti Vaxxing Movement”

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The anti-vaccination movement has been in the news a lot lately, with New Jersey Governor Chris Christie drawing fire for stating parents should have a measure of choice when it comes to deciding whether or not to vaccinate their children. Voices in the Street hit the street to ask your friends and neighbors what they think about the movement, whether you feel vaccinations contribute to higher rates of autism in children, a parent’s right to choose and what are some of the ramifications of this movement.

Bloomington is at gold standard for community biking

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Bloomington’s status as a bicycle-friendly community has been elevated to gold-level by the League of American Bicyclists. Vince Caristo, the city’s Bicycle and Pedestrian Coordinator, spoke to the City Council last night.
Caristo says this places Bloomington in the top 25 cities to accommodate for bicycle enthusiast. He is also very proud of Bloomington’s promotion in the award from 4 years prior.
Bloomington has seen an 88% increase in bicycle facilities overall according to Caristo.

Caristo said that the honor was due in large part to the Council’s own initiatives, which have changed Bloomington’s infrastructure in ways that have increased ridership in Bloomington.

Caristo said the city’s painted bike lanes and a free, updated bike map have made bike-riding more accessible. He also highlighted the civil streets education campaign’s multiple transportation partners. Caristo said that the percent of bike commuters have quadrupled since 2013

The percentage of bike commuters is determined using data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Council member Steve Volan asked how close Bloomington is to receiving the highest possible designation for bike friendliness.
Bloomington council members still says we have awhile before Bloomington can receive a platinum bicycle rating, considering it took them four years to receive a gold since their last award.

Council member Marty Spechler asked if the city was considering a bike rental program, which he had enjoyed as a tourist in other cities. Caristo said that is has been discussed in the past and will also be on the agenda for the next meeting of the bicycle pedestrian safety commission. That meeting is Monday February 9th.

Daily Local News – February 5, 2015

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Bloomington’s status as a bicycle-friendly community has been elevated to gold-level by the League of American Bicyclists;The Indiana Department of Corrections punished a prisoner after he publicly proclaimed his innocence;The city of Bloomington officially launches its Black History Month events tonight with a program in the City Council chambers

FEATURE
The race for the next mayor of Bloomington has begun. The final day for candidates to file is tomorrow. This will be the first election in more than a decade in which Mayor Mark Kruzan is not a contender. Kruzan has announced he won’t seek reelection after completing his third term as mayor later this year. Last week Kruzan was in the WFHB studios to speak with William Hosea and Cornelius Wright of Bring It On, our weekly African American public affairs show. We bring you a portion of that conversation for today’s WFHB community report.

VOICES IN THE STREET
The anti-vaccination movement has been in the news a lot lately, with New Jersey Governor Chris Christie drawing fire for stating parents should have a measure of choice when it comes to deciding whether or not to vaccinate their children. Voices in the Street hit the street to ask your friends and neighbors what they think about the movement, whether you feel vaccinations contribute to higher rates of autism in children, a parent’s right to choose and what are some of the ramifications of this movement.

CREDITS
Anchors: Carolyn VandeWiele, Scott Weddle
Today’s headlines were written by Joe Crawford
Along with Alycin Bektesh for CATSweek, a partnership with Community Access Television Services.
Our feature was produced by Michael Hilton.
Voices in the Street was produced by Kelly Wherley,
Our engineer today is Jose Rodriguez.
Our theme music is provided by the Impossible Shapes.
Managing Producer is Alycin Bektesh
Executive Producer is Joe Crawford.

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