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Author Archives: WFHB News

Bloomington Beware! – Ebola Scams

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Ebola is a very serious problem, but the worst danger we face right now is unscrupulous people pushing the panic button. Scammers and politicians are trying to use the outbreak to swindle you, and here’s why you don’t have to let them get away with it.

Citizens Object to Lethal Control of Deer Population

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A group of citizens continues to work to delay a measure adopted by the Bloomington City Council to thin out the deer population at Griffy Lake – this week’s council meeting here, in today’s community report.

The city of Bloomington website has a dedicated section to the deer task force report.

Indiana State Health Department Establishes Call Center for Questions About Ebola Virus

Yesterday the Indiana State Health Department announced the establishment a call center for the public to ask questions regarding the Ebola Virus Disease. Health representatives will be available to answer questions over the phone regarding the disease’s symptoms, screening procedures, and diagnosis of the potential problem. Those symptoms are similar to influenza: diarrhea, fever, headaches and joint/muscle pain, overall weakness, and stomach pain and abnormal bleeding.

The call center telephone number is 877-826-011 and will be available Mondays through Fridays from 8:55 AM through 4:15 PM. The Health Department reminds Hoosiers that Ebola is NOT spread through the air or by casual contact. Currently only individuals who have traveled to Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia are at risk of having been exposed to Ebola.

Daily Local News – October 22, 2014

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Three Hoosier swimmers are using crowdsourcing to raise money for their Olympic dreams; Last week Governor Pence announced that his administration would not seek a federal education grant that could have brought up to 80 million dollars to Indiana to fund pre-kindergarten education; Yesterday the Indiana State Health Department announced the establishment a call center for the public to ask questions regarding the Ebola Virus Disease; Monroe County is days away from finishing what one official says is a nearly final draft of some much-debated zoning rules; Monroe County is preparing to spend $2 million on new projects, mostly aimed at making county buildings more energy efficient.

FEATURE
A group of citizens continues to work to delay a measure adopted by the Bloomington City Council to thin out the deer population at Griffy Lake – this week’s council meeting here, in today’s community report.

BLOOMINGTON BEWARE!
Ebola is a very serious problem, but the worst danger we face right now is unscrupulous people pushing the panic button. Scammers and politicians are trying to use the outbreak to swindle you, and here’s why you don’t have to let them get away with it.

CREDITS
Anchors: Kelly Wherley, Cathi Norton
Today’s headlines were written by Susan Northleaf, Alycin Bektesh and Anson Shupe
Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, in partnership with Community Access Television services
Bloomington Beware was produced by Richard Fish, and Anson Shupe
Our engineer today is Adam Reichle
Our theme music is provided by the Impossible Shapes
Managing Producer is Joe Crafword
Executive Producer is Alycin Bektesh

Governor Pence Declines Possibility on 80 Million Dollar Grant for Pre-Kindergarten Education

Last week Governor Pence announced that his administration would not seek a federal education grant that could have brought up to 80 million dollars to Indiana to fund pre-kindergarten education.  According to the Indianapolis Star, Pence’s Family and Social Services Administration had worked with the state Department of Education writing this grant and it came as a surprise that the Governor would not submit the grant.  A previous grant submitted last year was rejected. The odds of getting funded this year are thought to be greatly improved because Indiana is one of just two states labeled ‘category one’ states, identified as those states with highest need.

In an opinion piece published Monday on the Indystar website, Pence defended his decision, saying that Indiana has its own, five county, pre-K pilot program that will start next year and, “It is important not to allow the lure of federal grant dollars to define our state’s mission and programs.”

State Superintendent, Glenda Ritz, also published an opinion piece on the website.  She stressed that after last year’s application was rejected, the governor reiterated his support to seek federal funds this year.  She expressed disappointment that, after the grant was completed, the Governor changed his mind and would not sign it.  Her opinion piece says, “Published reports indicate the governor was under intense lobbying from out-of-state special interests. Those special interests wanted to reject federal support for early childhood education.”

On Monday Senator Donnelly’s office issued a press release also expressing disappointment with the decision.  In a letter to the Governor, Donnelly asked Pence to provide answers to specific questions about why the Governor decided not to submit the grant.

The deadline for submission is today. The grant cannot be submitted without the Governor’s signature.

Human Remains found in Mobile Home Park

From the City of Bloomington Police Department:

This Morning the Bloomington Police Department responded to a call of possible human remains being found on a vacant lot at Arlington Valley Mobile Home Park located at 1600 North Willis Drive. Property managers made the discovery while cleaning up the lot that had been vacant since a mobile home was moved from it sometime this summer.

It appeared that a plastic storage bin had been placed over the remains which was located at the rear of the vacant lot. Upon arrival, officers and detectives confirmed the remains were human and found them to be in an advanced stage of decomposition. Initial estimates indicate the remains may be two to three months old. No indication of age, race or gender was able to be made.

The Bloomington Police Department is working with the Monroe County Coroner’s Office who also had representatives at the scene. The remains have been transported to the University of Indianapolis where personnel from the Anthropology Department will assist with identification and a possible cause of death. According to the Coroner, results may not be available for four (4) to six (6) weeks.

The death investigation is ongoing and additional details will be released as it becomes available.

Interchange – Brave New GMOs

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Tonight’s guest is long-time critic of genetically modified organisms and foods, Marti Crouch, a noted academic research scientist in plant molecular biology who turned her back on that career due to concerns about potential impacts of genetic engineering in agriculture.

With and a new wave of genetically engineered crops (GMOs) about to be commercialized, the battle for hearts and minds is heating up. Are GMOs required to feed the burgeoning population and to save the planet, as the biotech industry claims, or are GMOs a toxic hindrance to true food security and environmental sustainability, as critics contend? Join our guest, long-time GMO critic Marti Crouch, as we explore the implications of Dow Chemical’s new corn and soybeans engineered to withstand the WWII-era weedkiller 2,4-D – approved by federal regulators just a few weeks ago; Monsanto’s new herbicide-resistant cotton and soybean, Arctic apples that don’t turn brown, eucalyptus trees that withstand freezing, golden rice designed to alleviate vitamin A deficiencies, and other brave new crops on our horizon.

Ralph Waldo Emerson writes in his great 1842 Essay Experience that “Nature hates calculators; her methods are saltatory and impulsive.”

Marti Crouch has written that “Genes have an ecology – a complex way of interacting with themselves and the environment – that can interfere with the linear logic of genetic engineering.”

Nature leaps and dances upon (and over and under and to the side of) the linear…

Guest Bio:

Martha Crouch, Ph.D., Science Consultant

Marti was a graduate student at Yale University studying the development of seeds and flowers when genes were first cloned in the 1970s.  By the time she headed her own plant molecular biology lab at Indiana University in the 1980s, plant genes were being patented. Prof. Crouch became concerned about potential impacts of genetic engineering in agriculture and her own contributions, and as a result shut down her research lab in the 1990s and taught courses on the intersections of technology, food and agriculture, with an emphasis on environmental impacts. In 2001, Marti left Indiana University, and now pursues independent scholarship and consulting.  Her background thus spans the whole history of genetic engineering in agriculture, as both a participant and a critic, giving Marti a valuable set of skills and perspectives for her work on impacts of recent technologies for non-profits such as the Center for Food Safety.  Marti is also the official wild mushroom inspector at the Bloomington Community Farmers’ Market.

Credits
Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Social Media Coordinator: Carissa Barrett
Executive Producer: Alycin Bektesh

Ins and Outs of Money – What Smart Spenders Know

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How can two people have about the same income, yet enjoy a different quality of life? It might have to do with spending. Smart spenders know where their money comes from and where it’s going–giving them more control over their finances and their life.

President McRobbie Details New Plans For Indiana University

Indiana University President Michael McRobbie unveiled a five year plan last week.

McRobbie’s State of the University address was devoted to what he labelled his Bicentennial Strategic Plan, which is to be implemented during the lead up to IU’s two hundredth year anniversary in 2020. The Bloomington campus should see more construction and renovation as well as the introduction of new schools and strategic changes to older schools. Most of the capital investment is to be focused on renovation of buildings around the Old Crescent, to the immediate east of Sample Gates. The plan also calls for renovating the old Wells Quad buildings to return them to their original residential function.

As for academics, McRobbie wants to put more emphasis on what he calls ‘Building and Making’, which means developing products that can be commercialized to the university and economy’s benefit. He wants to see the campus create engineering programs in art and design, and in information technology. Work on consolidating old programs into the new umbrella media school and fleshing out the new schools of public health, and global and international studies will continue.

A significant decline in enrollment at the school of education, coinciding with on-going changes in the state’s treatment of the teaching profession, and the imminent departure of the school’s long-serving Dean González, prompted the President to announce that he would establish a Blue Ribbon Panel of external experts, charged with not only making recommendations on a new dean, but undertaking a comprehensive evaluation of the school’s entire operation and making recommendations for its future.

The cultural life of people connected with the university as well as the larger community was the focus of the plan’s section on supporting creativity and cultural enrichment which noted the multi-million dollar investment over the last decade on teaching and presentation of music, theater, visual art, film, and other forms of art and entertainment.

Bloomingfoods Market and Deli Cooperative Holds Annual Meeting

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Bloomingfoods Market and Deli Cooperative held its annual meeting of the membership last week. The General Manager and Board president both addressed the crowd of more than 300 attendees, focusing their summaries on the recent efforts of Bloomingfoods workers to join a union. There were also break out discussions focused on the unionization efforts, management/employee relations, and board communications. WFHB correspondent David Murphy attended the meeting, and spoke with Bloomingfoods President Tim Clougher. Their discussion, here, in today’s community report.

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