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Author Archives: WFHB News

Derek Wall on Elinor Ostrom – Economy and Ecology

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The Bogazici University Summer School on Institutions, Justice and Democracy was held this June in Istanbul, Turkey. The event included discussions on environmental justice. Filiz Cicek spoke with one of the attendees, Derek Wall, who is the International Coordinator of the Green Party of England and Wales. Wall discusses late IU Professor Elinor Ostrom’s Nobel Prize-winning theories on economy and ecology.

IN Nature – The Beaver

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This IN Nature segment features the Beaver.

Dr. Rob Stone on the Future of the Affordable Care Act

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Last week the Supreme Court upheld a part of the Affordable Care Act, commonly known as Obamacare. The Court ruled it is legal for the federal government to offer subsidies to help people purchase health insurance. The decision was widely praised by supporters of the health care law. Yesterday, Joe Crawford sat down with Doctor Rob Stone, the founder of Hoosiers for a Common Sense Health Plan. We bring you a portion of that conversation for today’s WFHB community report.

Commission on Hispanic and Latino Affairs Seeks Nominees

The Commission on Hispanic and Latino Affairs Awards is looking for nominees for their 5th annual awards ceremony. Viable candidates must be advocates in the Latino Community and exemplify leadership, initiative, advocacy, and dedication in Monroe county.There will be four categories of awards: The Latino Leader Award, Outstanding Latino High School Senior Award, Community Organization/Agency Award and The Latino Community Supporter Award.

Awards will be presented on September 15th at the Mathers Museum to kick off National Hispanic Heritage Month. Nominations must include name, address, telephone number, e-mail and the reason why the candidate merits the award. Nomination forms can be completed online at www.bloomington.in.gov/chla, or may be dropped off at Bloomington’s Community and Family Resources Department at City Hall. All submissions are due August 14th.

Better Beware! – Password!

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Staying safe online requires passwords — probably many of them — and the problem of choosing and remembering good ones is getting worse and worse. Here are some things to think about and try.

Board of Zoning Appeals Denies Brewer’s Request

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The control the city of Bloomington government exercises over housing near IU was demonstrated last week at a meeting of the city Board of Zoning Appeals. Local property owner Derk Brewer asked the Board for permission to have more than three unrelated adults live in his house on State Road 46. According to Planning and Transportation Director Tom Micuda, the request was unusual.

Brewer’s house is west of the commercial area at the intersection of State Road 46 and North Walnut, which is just northwest of the I.U. campus. Brewer plans to add two additional bedrooms to what is now a three bedroom house. It’s legal for Brewer to add on to the house, but Micuda says the city only allows three unrelated adults to live on properties with residential single family zoning.

The city asked Brewer to sign a commitment that he would not allow more than three unrelated adults to live in the house. The area has a history of houses being converted to student rentals. That was prior to the city’s introduction and enforcement of stricter zoning regulations. Brewer was also cited in 2011 for allowing too many people to live in other properties he owns. Assistant city attorney, Patty Mulvihill, says the city is within its rights to ask Brewer to sign the commitment.

The board voted unanimously to deny Brewer’s request. That means that in order to get a building permit, he will have to sign the commitment to allow no more than three unrelated adults to live in the house.

Fair Labor Initiative Gains Support of Local Restaurants

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The Bloomington Human Rights Commission is continuing to encourage fair labor practices in local restaurants. Since the Commission began the Fair Labor Initiative in December, the program has gained the support of more than 30 local eateries. Participating restaurants have pledged they will comply with the Fair Labor Standards Act, including minimum wage, overtime, tip-paying and record-keeping requirements. They also promise to work in compliance with the Occupational Safety and Health Act by providing training, safety gear, and following poster requirements. Restaurants must also pledge to abide by equal employment laws that prohibit discrimination and harassment. And they must carry Unemployment insurance and comply with workers’ compensation requirements. The Director of Bloomington’s Human Rights Commission Barbara McKinney says recent efforts to get more restaurants signed up have included getting IU students involved.

The Fair Labor Initiative has decals for the fronts of establishments that participate. The decals are round with a yellow background and feature a knife, fork and spoon graphic, along with the words “This establishment affirms its compliance with fair labor practices.” The hope is that some customers will choose where to eat based on the presence of the decals.

Much of what the Fair Labor Initiative covers is already part of federal law. But McKinney says many of the laws are difficult to enforce in restaurants. She says that this program focuses on prevention and education. She says restaurants are better off learning to follow the law rather than deal with enforcement from federal regulators.

Any business interesting in learning more about the Fair Labor Initiative can contact Barbara McKinney at 812-349-3429.

Daily Local News – July 1, 2015

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The Bloomington Human Rights Commission is continuing to encourage fair labor practices in local restaurants; The control the city of Bloomington government exercises over housing near IU was demonstrated last week at a meeting of the city Board of Zoning Appeals; The Bloomington 4th of July Parade takes place this Saturday beginning at 10 am; The Commission on Hispanic and Latino Affairs Awards is looking for nominees for their 5th annual awards ceremony; IU Outdoor Adventures is holding stand up paddle boarding lessons through July 29th.

FEATURE
Last week the Supreme Court upheld a part of the Affordable Care Act, commonly known as Obamacare. The Court ruled it is legal for the federal government to offer subsidies to help people purchase health insurance. The decision was widely praised by supporters of the health care law. Yesterday I sat down with Doctor Rob Stone, the founder of Hoosiers for a Common Sense Health Plan. We bring you a portion of that conversation for today’s WFHB community report.

BLOOMINGTON BEWARE
Staying safe online requires passwords — probably many of them — and the problem of choosing and remembering good ones is getting worse and worse. Here are some things to think about and try.

CREDITS
Anchors: Kelly Wherley and Joe Crawford
Today’s headlines were written by Kara Tullman, Ivy Bridges
Along with David Murphy for CATSweek, in partnership with Community Access Television services
Better Beware was produced by Richard Fish
Our feature was produced by Doug Storm
Our engineers today are Adam Reichle and Brian Lloyd
Our theme music is provided by the Impossible Shapes
Executive Producer is Joe Crawford

Interchange – What Makes Us Vulnerable: The Essential Ellen Willis

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Our topic for the next hour is the cultural and critical writing of Ellen Willis who was the New Yorker‘s first rock critic and the cofounder of the radical feminist group the Redstockings. Her essays have been described as always unsettling, combining passion and moral clarity, espresso for the feminist soul, and relevant as ever, with a continuing influence on critics of American culture today.

Ellen Willis was a great fan and a great “reader” of Bob Dylan. I’ll have to admit as someone with little invested in Dylan and it was only in reading Willis’s “breakout” essay on Dylan published first in the magazine Cheetah in 1967 (and called “Dylan”) that I was intellectually engaged in thinking about Dylan and the album that the song appears on, John Wesley Harding. This album, appearing to be a retreat back onto well-trod ground, was rather a work serving the purpose of liberation…that is liberating Dylan, and the rest of us, from the Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper. More on that in the program.

Joining us via phone is Nona Willis Aronowitz, the daughter of Ellen Willis, who has edited two collections of her mother’s essays both published by the University of Minnesota Press, one called Out of the Vinyl Deeps, consists of Willis’s Rock criticism and the other, The Essential Ellen Willis, spans four decades and seems to cover nearly every topic of social and cultural importance you might think of (abortion, radical feminism, sexism terrorism, the family, male supremacy, terrorism, motherhood, racism, Judaism, fundamentalism, liberalism, and on).

A key theme that often runs through Willis’s work is vulnerability and her writing style seems to be pitched towards always understanding that common quality. The best way to understand this I think might be to think of it simply as respect for any audience to which she might be speaking. This seems more and more a very rare quality.

Guest
Nona Willis Aronowitz is the editor of TalkingPointsMemo’s The Slice and TPMCafe. Previously, she was an education and poverty reporter at NBC News Digital, a fellow at the Roosevelt Institute, and an associate editor at GOOD magazine. She’s written for The Atlantic, Washington Post, NYMag.com, The Nation, The American Prospect, Tablet, and Rookie, among others.

Related
Ellen Willis Tumblr
There are photos and many links to Willis’s essays and reviews of the two collections edited by Nona Willis Aronowitz along with some video.

Music
“All Along the Watchtower” by Bob Dylan
“Maybe” by Janis Joplin
“Someday Never Comes” by Creedence Clearwater Revival
“Beginning to See the Light” by The Velvet Underground

Credits
Host & Producer: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Joe Crawford
Executive Producer: Joe Crawford

The Vast Influence of Indiana University’s Collins Living Learning Center

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To any Indiana University outsider, the Collins Residence Center is just like any other residence hall. However the residence hall made the news last year when transgender actress and former IU student Laverne Cox said she switched from another dormitory to Collins Living and Learning Center for a more welcoming atmosphere. WFHB wanted to find out what makes Collins different than other residence halls on campus, and how that influences students who stay there. Correspondent Kara Tullman spoke with two former Collins residents as well as the residence hall director for today’s WFHB community report.

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