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Author Archives: WFHB News

Daily Local News – January 21, 2014

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Purdue University officials confirmed today that one man was fatally shot and one suspect was taken into custody following a shooting that occurred on campus around noon; Bloomington Transit announced it has awarded contracts for exterior design and art work for the new Downtown Transit Center; The Monroe County Public Library’s Board of Trustees discussed the negative effect parking meters are having on library patrons; The citizens advisory committee to the Monroe County Solid Waste Management District discussed plans for supporting a new recycling facility; Jury selection started today in the trial of the former manager of the Little Nashville Opry House that burned down in 2009; A non-profit children and family services provider is holding free monthly information sessions in Bloomington about becoming a foster parent.

FEATURE
Legislation Introduced to Prevent Demolition Six Historic Houses on IU Campus
A local state legislator has introduced a bill that would prevent Indiana University from demolishing six historic houses to make room for a new fraternity house. WFHB Assistant News Director Joe Crawford spoke with Representative Matt Pierce about the measure for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

INS AND OUTS OF MONEY
Credit card scams and identity theft aren’t as rare as you think. Learn how to protect yourself from fraud, and find out about resources you can use to become a more informed consumer.

CREDITS
Anchors: Casey Kuhn, Nick Tumino
Today’s headlines were written by David Murphy and Chelsea Hardy,
Our feature was produced by Joe Crawford.
The Ins and Outs of Money is produced by Dan Withered, in partnership with the Monroe County Public Library and The United Way of Monroe County.
Editor and engineer is Drew Daudelin, executive producer is Alycin Bektesh.

Books Unbound – Lady Chatterley’s Lover, Part 10

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Born in 1885, David Herbert Lawrence was an English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, and painter. His collective works are classified as a reflection of the dehumanizing effects of modernity and industrialization. His marriage in 1914 to Frieda Weekly, a woman who left her husband and three children for Lawrence, provided inspiration and emotional support for his literary career. Lawrence died in 1930, reaching his peak of fame posthumously.

Banned by U.S. Customs (1929). Banned in Ireland (1932), Poland (1932), Australia (1959), Japan (1959), India (1959). Banned in Canada (1960) until 1962. Dissemination of Lawrence’s novel has been stopped in China (1987) because the book “will corrupt the minds of young people and is also against the Chinese tradition.” Lady Chatterley’s Lover was the object of numerous obscenity trials in both the UK and the United States up into the 1960s.

Lady Chatterley’s Lover, first published privately in 1928, was not published openly in Britain until 1960. It tells the story of the love affair between Constance (Lady Chatterley) and her husband Clifford’s gamekeeper, Oliver Mellors, while exploring the nature of relationships between men and women. Besides the evident sexual content of the book, “Chatterley” spurred controversy for its discussion of the British social class system and social conflict. Penguin, the publisher of the unexpurgated text in 1960, was unsuccessfully tried for violation of the 1959 Obscene Publications Act. The prosecutor was ridiculed for asking, “Is this the kind of book you would wish your wife or servants to read?”

Daily Local News – January 17, 2014

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The Bloomington City Council debated how to balance automobile, bicycle, and pedestrian traffic at a meeting on Wednesday; The Monroe County Council moved toward increasing the salary of Chief Public Defender Michael Hunt by about fourteen thousand dollars last week; Indiana has received a D+ grade from the American College of Emergency Physicians, or ACEP, a national medical society that creates annual report cards for each state grading conditions under which emergency care is delivered.

FEATURE
Indiana University Vice President and General Counsel Jackie Simmons spoke before the Indiana House of Representative’s Judiciary committee on Monday, during consideration of House Joint Resolution 3, the proposed constitutional amendment outlawing same sex marriage.

VOLUNTEER CONNECTION
Indiana University Vice President Jackie Simmons on HJR-3
A weekly snapshot of how people of all ages can match their time and talents to local needs. Each week Volunteer Connection brings you the “featured five” – five ways to get involved NOW! Volunteer Connection is a co-production of WFHB and the City of Bloomington Volunteer Network, working together to build an empowered, vibrant, and engaged community!

CREDITS
Anchors: Helen Harrell, Bill Daugherty
Today’s headlines were written by Drew Daudelin,
Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, a partnership with Community Access Television Services.
Our feature was produced by Alycin Bektesh
Volunteer Connection is produced by Wanda Krieger, in partnership with the city of Bloomington Volunteer Network
Our engineer is Nick Tumino
Executive Producer is Alycin Bektesh

bloomingOUT – January 16, 2014

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Director of New York City’s Up2Us Center Megan Bartlett talks about the importance of sports and healthy youth, discrimination, education of coaches and creating a supportive environment for players, parents and coaching staff. FTM performer and author Scott Turner Schofield discusses his career, books and current gender related issues. Featured artist is Canadian singer-songwriter Jeffery Straker. Musical selection is “Somewhere Between” from his “Step Right Up” CD.

www.up2us.org
www.scott-t-schofield.com
www.jeffstraker.com

Producer Carol Fischer
Executive Producer Alycin Bektesh
Associate Producer Sarah Hetrick
News Director Josh Vidrich
Original Theme Music by Mikial Robertson
Announcer Sarah Hetrick

EcoReport – January 16, 2014

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In today’s EcoReport feature, Jodi Perras from the Sierra Club’s Beyond Coal Campaign, talks about a recent Indiana Supreme Court ruling that could leave Indiana ratepayers shouldering the cost of a new coal gasification plant in Spencer county.

EcoReport is a weekly program providing independent media coverage of environmental and ecological issues with a focus on local, state and regional people, issues, and events in order to foster open discussion of human relationships with nature and the Earth and to encourage you to take personal responsibility for the world in which we live. Each program features timely eco-related headline news, a feature interview or event recording, and a calendar of events of interest to the environmentally conscious.

This week’s news stories were written by Linda Greene and Norm Holy. This week’s feature was engineered by Stephanie Stewart. This week’s calendar was compiled by me, Kristina Wiltsee. Our broadcast engineer is Dan Withered. Producers for EcoReport are Kelly Miller and Dan Young. Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh.

Interchange – Martin Spechler and Bill Mullen: On the Boycott of Israeli Universities

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Indiana University Economics Professor Martin Spechler and Purdue University American Studies Professor Bill Mullen debate the recent boycott of Israeli universities by the American Studies Association. Mullen is one of eight Indiana professors who signed an editorial supporting the boycott. Spechler has publicly stated his opposition to the boycott in a letter to the editor published in the Herald-Times. Spechler and Mullen discuss the use of boycott as a tool, the implications of an academic organization taking a political stand, and what the issue means for academic freedom. WFHB Assistant News Director Joe Crawford moderates the conversation.

Daily Local News – January 14, 2014

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This week on The Strike Mic, members of the Indiana University assembly are holding a day of action in support of the prisoners at Westville Correctional Facility; Local police are receiving ongoing reports of parking meter vandalism in Bloomington; The proposed restructuring of classes at Fairview School that brought angry parents to school board offices has been stopped; This is the last week to set out Christmas trees and wreaths for pickup by the City of Bloomington Sanitation Department.

FEATURE
The U.S. State Department reports nearly 9,000 children were adopted abroad by U.S. families last year. The number of international adoptions has risen in recent decades, and adopting abroad can pose unique questions for parents as they help their growing children to frame their own identities. Now, the story of Bloomington mother Victoria McQueen’s experience guiding her daughter’s growing sense of identity. American Student Radio reporter Sudeshna Chowdhury brings us the story for today’s WFHB feature report.

INS AND OUTS OF MONEY
Understanding your credit report and score is an essential piece of financial stability. Learn how to access your credit report, what it all means, and how to address credit problems on this week’s episode of WFHB’s weekly financial segment The Ins and Outs of Money.

CREDITS
Anchors: Shayne Laughter, Nick Tumino
Today’s headlines were written by David Murphy, Drew Daudelin, and Alycin Bektesh.
Our feature was produced by Sudeshna Chowdhury.
The Ins and Outs of Money is produced by Dan Withered, in partnership with the Monroe County Public Library and The United Way of Monroe County.
Editor is Drew Daudelin, engineer and executive producer is Alycin Bektesh.

Last Week To Throw Out Christmas Trees and Wreaths

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This is the last week to set out Christmas trees and wreaths for pickup by the City of Bloomington Sanitation Department. Residents can place the items on the curb, along with their trash and recycling, on their regularly scheduled pick-up day. Lights, ornaments, and other decorations need to be removed from the trees. The last day for tree pick-up is Monday, January 20.

Fairvew Elementary School To Reorganize Classes Due To Parents’ Protests

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The proposed restructuring of classes at Fairview School that brought angry parents to school board offices has been stopped, according to Beverly Smith, Director of School and Community Services at the Monroe County Community School Corporation.

“Our Director of Elementary Education Tammy Miller is serving as the interim principal at Fairview School through the end of this year,” Smith said, “She, in her wisdom as the director and a former principal, projected, suggested, and put in place some changes that would have taken place on Monday. Through some further input from staff and parents, Mrs. Miller made the suggestion to the superintendent that we not go forward with those changes. She is going to work with parents in the future to craft plans that will allow folks to work together and come up with what is best for Fairview.”

Smith confirmed reports that the proposed changes were to create smaller classes of students with below standard literacy skills.

This determination was based on a variety of performance evaluations of students including, in particular, those from the Northwest Literacy Evaluation reports.

Beyond the now suspended restructuring of classes, there was also concern expressed by parents that these changes might impact Fairview’s adoption and development of the Artful Learning program, and associated changes in teaching, curriculum and enrollment.

“At this point what we are most focused on is that, as of today, students will be returning to their original classroom assignments that they enjoyed during the first semester. School will go on as normal and Mrs. Miller will work with teachers and parents to return students to the classrooms and work together for the advancement of Fairview.”

The original and strongest complaint voiced by Fairview parents was the lack of consultation with parents by the school or district administration, or even of direct notice beforehand of the proposals prior to their adoption.

However, the parental protests brought about an immediate meeting with school board officials, including District Superintendent Judith Demuth, yesterday morning.

This was followed up with the announcement of the scheduling of Fairview Family Meetings Monday, January 13, and next Monday, January 21 at 6:30 p.m, at Fairview School.

Smith acknowledged that the parents’ protests, as well as comments from teaching staff, helped prompt the reversal of the class restructuring plans.

“It’s always wise to have as much input from all of your stakeholders as possible,” Smith said, “I believe that this situation just underscored that this practice is something we enjoy and continue.”

Smith says that consultation with Fairview parents and teachers will continue, to decide how best to address the immediate issue of students literacy, the evaluation of students’ performance, and the best means to address any perceived deficiencies.

Parking Meter Vandals Continue, Police Say

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Local police are receiving ongoing reports of parking meter vandalism in Bloomington.

Susie Johnson, director of the city’s Public Works department, says she doesn’t want to go into detail on the vandalism, but that it has been minimal so far.

“I really would rather not go into it, and not draw attention to it because I think it fans the flames,” Johnson said, “The more we talk about it, the more people want to do it.”

Johnson says parking meter vandalism has been declining, and that she doesn’t know if the incidents have been organized or random, but that Bloomington police are investigating.

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