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Author Archives: WFHB News

bloomingOUT – March 6, 2014

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Canadian singer/songwriter Toni Vere is live in studio for interview and performance. Musical selections are “When You Were Here,” “Free,” “Sane” and “Levi Strauss.” Cassaundra and Michael respond to Q Mail Bag question “Why is the LGBTQ community focusing on legalizing marriage when we can still be fired for simply being lesbian, gay, bisexual or trans?”

www.tonivere.com

Producer Carol Fischer
Executive Producer Alycin Bektesh
Associate Producer Sarah Hetrick
News Director Josh Vidrich
Original Theme Music Mikial Robertson
Announcer Sarah Hetrick
Guest Co Anchor Cassaundra Huskey

Indiana passes bill to increase local recycling effort

A bill that will increase recycling efforts in Indiana was passed on Tuesday. Indiana State Senator Mike Stoops, who has supported House Bill 1183, talks about what spurred its creation.

“The idea is to identify recycling that is being thrown away with trash,” Stoops says, “We had a study committee that identified a significant amount of recycling in Indiana being thrown into a landfill. There was a lot of discussion about the fact that Indiana was lagging behind other states to turn that material into useful resources.”

The bill will require Indiana businesses and recycling centers to report all recycling activity to the Indiana Department of Environmental Management.

Recyclers of municipal waste can choose to report annually or quarterly, and non-municipal waste recyclers can be report voluntarily. This will be required starting in 2015. It establishes a goal for Indiana to reduce 50 percent of municipal waste by 2019.

“Indiana had a goal like this in the past,” Stoops says, “We didn’t take any steps to get to that goal then. A couple years ago they completely eliminated the recycling goal under Mitch Daniels.”

Senator Stoops says the specific types of products Indiana will be recycling aluminum cans, and that these are beneficial to aluminum companies as well, because they don’t need a lot of processing to recycle the aluminum, don’t need to spend money on mining aluminum ore, and that aluminum doesn’t degrade, so it is always recyclable.

Both Senator Stoops and Press Secretary of the Indiana Senate Democratic Caucus Sean Mobley believe this bill will create thousands of jobs in Indiana.

“One estimate is that if we do a better job of getting the recycling out of the waste stream, we could be looking at 10,000 jobs,” Stoops says.

This bill will go into effect along with Senate Bill 324, which bans the disposal of mostly recyclable products.

Any product that is entirely, or almost entirely, made of paper, cardboard, glass, aluminum, or plastic is not to be disposed of in a final disposal facility. Both bills will go into effect on July 1.

Shallow lake fish affected by heavy ice and snow

As Spring approaches, owners of shallow ponds and lakes will have to watch out for fish kills due to the accumulation of snow and ice this winter. The lakes and ponds of Indiana are currently covered in up to twenty inches of thick ice. Neil Ledet, District Fisheries Biologist in northeastern Indiana, says this is a result of the long winter.

“This is a pretty unusual winter for us,” Ledet says, “We had early ice, a lot of snow, and with that ice thickness, there isn’t a lot of light penetration to get to the aquatic plants. We’ll see low oxygen levels in lakes and ponds. It could be a tough situation for shallow lakes and ponds”

Shoveling up snow will allow light to penetrate the ice, but Ledet says that once this becomes an issue there’s not much anyone can do about it. He explains what pond and lake owners CAN do if the same thing happens next winter.

“In the future, lake owners could make sure there aren’t a lot of weeds covering the lake before the winter comes,” Ledet says, “The important thing is that if people lose all of their pond, they’re going to want to start over with an appropriate pond stocking program. We have a pond management booklet to help that.”

Ledet says that fish kills occurred more often during the 1970’s and 80’s, when winters were a little more severe. If Lake residents and anglers discover fish kills on public waters they can contact their district fisheries biologist online at wildlife.in.gov.

Bloomington Arts Project Grant Money Grows

The City of Bloomington Arts Commission has announced that revised guidelines and applications are available for the April Cycle of its 2014 Arts Project Grant Program.Grant amounts have been increased to $1,500 for 2014.

The program supported 34 arts projects in 2013. The Commission will hold a drop-in workshop for applicants on Wednesday, March 12 from 4 to 5 p.m. in the McCloskey Conference room in City Hall.

Grant applications that have been submitted will be reviewed during the Bloomington Arts Commission meeting, scheduled to take place on April 9 at 4 p.m. The event is free and open to the public.

The application deadline is April 1 at 5 p.m. Guidelines and applications are available on the City of Bloomington Website.

 

EcoReport – March 6, 2014

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In today’s EcoReport feature, Ralph Keeling, professor at the Scripps Institute at the University of California – San Diego, discusses problems related to global carbon levels and climate.

EcoReport is a weekly program providing independent media coverage of environmental and ecological issues with a focus on local, state and regional people, issues, and events in order to foster open discussion of human relationships with nature and the Earth and to encourage you to take personal responsibility for the world in which we live. Each program features timely eco-related headline news, a feature interview or event recording, and a calendar of events of interest to the environmentally conscious.

Anchors: Dan Young and Trish Kerle
This week’s news stories were written by Linda Greene, Norm Holy, Stephanie Stewart, and Dan Young. This week’s feature was engineered by Stephanie Stewart. This week’s calendar was compiled by Kristina Wiltsee.

Our broadcast engineer is Dan Withered. Producers for EcoReport are Kelly Miller, Stephanie Stewart, and Dan Young. Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh.

Interchange – Minded By Algorithms: Digitizing the Word

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Host Doug Storm talks with Ted Striphas, an Associate Professor in the Department of Communication & Culture at Indiana University and the author of the 2009 title The Late Age of Print: Everyday Book Culture from Consumerism to Control, about the ways that book technology has evolved and the ways in which humans evolved with it. 

In discussing the digitization of “the word” we look at  Amazon.com’s Kindle: not only at the ways we read Kindles (and how they mimic the form of the book) but also how Kindles read us by sending information about our very marginalia back into the Cloud of knowing.

We also discuss the ways in which a digital information age bears a striking resemblance to what Hannah Arendt called a society where “there is nobody left with whom one could argue, to whom one could present grievances…in which everybody is deprived of political freedom, of the power to act; for the rule by Nobody is not no-rule, and where all are equally powerless we have a tyranny without a tyrant.”

‘Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense’ in Indiana Fight Bill That Would Allow Guns on School Property

The Indiana Chapter of an organization called Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America is fighting the passage of Senate Bill 229.

The bill would allow the carrying of firearms on school property, including in buses. It would also allow for firearms to be carried to off-campus school events such as graduation, prom, and field trips.

Nicki McNally, the Indiana chapter leader of the organization, believes that having more guns more places, especially where there are children, is not the right thing to do. She says it is extremely dangerous and will increase the risk of gun related incidents occurring.

The group also says the bill need some clarification, like whether or not a bus-driver would be allowed to carry a firearm while transporting students. Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America has a goal to create awareness and support for common sense gun reforms.

McNally advises fellow Hoosiers to send messages to Speaker Brian Bosma and the House Public Policy Committee in order to prevent the passage of this bill.

Habitat for Humanity Pushing to Develop on Controversial Land

The Bloomington Plan Commission voted February 24 to fast-track approval for a 35 home subdivision in what is currently an urban forest along the B-Line Trail.

Habitat for Humanity is seeking to develop the wooded area north of downtown between the B-Line and Reverend Ernest D. Butler Park.

Kerry Thompson, the president of Monroe County Habitat for Humanity, said her organization is running out of spaces to build in Bloomington.

“The largest obstacle for Habitat in recent years has been land,” Thompson said, “There simply are not enough infill lots remaining in the city of BLoomington to meet the needs of families. There is no affordable home ownership option close to the city center.”

The project would require the organization to cut down 64 percent of the trees in the area, which concerned many neighbors who attended the meeting. Some also questioned the high density of the proposed neighborhood and the revelation that soil is contaminated with lead, coal ash and other pollutants.

Marti Crouch, a biologist who lives near the site, said some might undervalue the wooded area in its current state.

“We have very little of that type of diverse native, urban forest in contiguous pieces in our city,” Crouch said, “I’m not sure what the definition of infill is, but I’m concerned that if the planning department thinks that every little green space needs to be turned into buildings and structures because that will somehow save outer areas from being developed, I’d like to see some facts on that.”

Crouch was referring to comments by local developer Matt Press, who described himself as a proponent of “good urban infill the right way.”

Press said denying Habitat this development would just force it to build houses on the outskirts of Bloomington.

“Nothing in the real world happens in a vacuum,” Press said, “The homeowners are already here in our community. If we say no to this project they will either continue to live in sub-standard housing or they will move into a new Habitat home, now likely built on a larger lot on the edge of town. That lot, in turn, would displace a market-rate home that will inevitably be built on yet a bigger piece of land on yet another former farm or forest.”

One major dispute involved Habitat’s request that the commission waive the requirement for a second hearing on the development.

Thompson said the organization wanted to speed up the city’s approval process so it could clear the forest by an April 1 deadline.

“Our request was made after we discovered that the Indiana bat could come to roost in the area,” Thompson said, “We had no intention to rush this process, in fact we have engaged pretty fully in the public comment process. We build by federal environmental regulations and unfortunately we have never encountered this stipulation for tree-clearing prior to April 1.”

Federal guidelines prohibit clearing trees from April through October to prevent disturbing roosting Indiana bats, which are endangered.

But several neighbors said they had just recently heard about Habitat’s plans, and they want more time to consider the implications of the new subdivision. Ruth Beasley was one of those neighbors.

“Finally, tonight, I’m getting bits and pieces of what I consider very complicated information,” Beasley said, “I want to read the documents for myself before I make a decision. I too have worked on Habitat houses. I love my Habitat neighbors. My daughter’s best friend has worked so hard to get her Habitat House. But I feel cheated in time to think, time to talk to my neighbors about what they think and I strongly urge you not to do away with the second hearing.”

Despite concerns from neighbors, the commission voted to waive the second hearing and forward the development to the City Council.

The council will hold two meetings on the issue before voting to approve to reject the proposal.

Bring It On! – March 3, 2014

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Clarence Boone and Bev Smith welcome Monroe County Community School Corporation talent and diversity specialist, Diane Hanks.

PART ONE
On Tonight’s show, Clarence and Bev welcome Diane Hanks, talent and diversity specialist for the Monroe County Community School Corporation, to the show.

Diane, the former vice-principal at Tri-North Middle School, joined the MCCSC in the new role in October of 2013. Her strategic role to bolster the pool of diverse talent in order to increase the number of MCCSC staff members who are minorities.

PART TWO
Headline news and local calendar events of interest to the African-American community.

CREDITS
Hosts: Clarence Boone and Bev Smith
Bring It On! is produced by Clarence Boone
Executive Producer Alycin Bektesh
Our News Editor is Michael Nowlin
Our Board Engineer is Chris Martin

bloomingOUT – February 27, 2014

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Consummate story teller Jim Doud talks about “Joe” on an edition of “Our View.” IU alum, Attorney and Cherokee Indian Becca Riall responds to a listener query “Why don’t Indians just become Americans?” by discussing the politics and government regulations as they relate to reservations in the U.S. Helen addresses the nursing career on an edition of “Queer Herstory. Featured artist is Oregon folk artist Josh Garrels and musical selections are “Flood Waters” and “Fire by Night” from his latest “The Sea InBetween” cd.

www.joshgarrels.com

Producer Carol Fischer
Executive Producer Alycin Bektesh
Associate Producer Sarah Hetrick
News Director Josh Vidrich
Original Theme Music Mikial Robertson
Announcer Sarah Hetrick

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