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Author Archives: WFHB News

EcoReport – February 26, 2015

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In today’s EcoReport feature, Keith Johnson, from Renaissance Farms, talks about Permaculture, composting, and gardening.

EcoReport is a weekly program providing independent media coverage of environmental and ecological issues with a focus on local, state and regional people, issues, and events in order to foster open discussion of human relationships with nature and the Earth and to encourage you to take personal responsibility for the world in which we live. Each program features timely eco-related headline news, a feature interview or event recording, and a calendar of events of interest to the environmentally conscious.

Today’s Anchors: Julianna Dailey and David Lyman.
This week’s news stories were written by Linda Greene, Norm Holy and Halle Shine. Our feature and broadcast engineer is Dan Withered. This week’s calendar was compiled by Catherine Anders.

EcoReport is produced by Dan Young, Filiz Cicek, Nancy Jones and Gillian Wilson. Executive producer is Joe Crawford.

Akwasi Owusu-Bempah Discusses the Dynamic Experience of African American Police Officers

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As police departments around the country are pressured to review the racial makeup of their staff, last week WFHB’s African American public affairs show Bring It On discussed the roles and experiences of black police officers. The hosts spoke with Akwasi Owusu-Bempah, an Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice and an Adjunct Professor within Indiana University’s Department of African American and Diaspora Studies. The show was hosted by Clarence Boone and Jim Sims. We bring you a portion of that conversation for today’s WFHB community report.

Debate Over How to Select Poll Members Ends Unresolved

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The Monroe County Election Board is debating how to recruit poll workers for local elections. Currently, recruitment is mostly up to representatives from the Republican and Democratic parties. The County Clerk’s Office takes over shortly before each election. But this system has resulted in Monroe County being consistently short-staffed leading up to elections. At a meeting last week County Clerk Linda Robbins and Republican Representative Bryan Lemonds advocated for the Clerk’s office to take over the responsibility of recruiting poll workers.

Once poll workers are recruited they work for the Election Board, not the individual parties. And Robbins said she hopes to recreate the work environment she first experienced when helping with elections. Robbins stated that the experience changed her life in the way that everyone worked together for a common goal.

Robbins had previously suggested that her office hire recruiters who would work under her supervision to find Democrat and Republican poll workers, but the Election Board at the time voted against that suggestion. Lemons was not on the Board the first time Robbins suggested the paid recruiting positions, and he said he would support that motion if she brought it up again. Democratic representative to the Election Board Lorraine Farrell said that she did not want to vote on the measure before consulting with the new chair of the local Democratic Party. Farrell says Democratic leadership has typically been opposed to in-house recruiting positions.

The Board agreed to table the issue and take it up the issue during their March meeting.

Daily Local News – February 25, 2015

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Today, State Health officials are warning of a rapidly spreading outbreak of HIV in the Southeastern portion of Indiana; A bill that would have affected solar energy throughout Indiana seems to be dead, at least for now; Bloomington Utilities Director Pat Murphy says it’s time to increase water rates; In a recent Gallup poll Indiana was rated one of the lowest in terms of well-being; The Monroe County Election Board is debating how to recruit poll workers for local elections.

FEATURE
As police departments around the country are pressured to review the racial makeup of their staff, last week WFHB’s African American public affairs show Bring It On discussed the roles and experiences of black police officers. The hosts spoke with Akwasi Owusu-Bempah, an Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice and an Adjunct Professor within Indiana University’s Department of African American and Diaspora Studies. The show was hosted by Clarence Boone and Jim Sims. We bring you a portion of that conversation for today’s WFHB community report.

BETTER BEWARE!
Today, we have a vintage episode of our weekly consumer watchdog segment Better Beware!

CREDITS
Anchors: Kelly Wherley and Sophia Saliby
Today’s headlines were written by Thomas Schneider, Jack Hanek and Joe Crawford
Along with Alycin Bektesh for CATSweek, in partnership with Community Access
Television services
Bloomington Beware was produced by Richard Fish
Our feature was produced by Joe Crawford
Our engineers today are Jim Lang, Matt Gwaltney and Adam Reichle
Our theme music is provided by the Impossible Shapes
Executive Producer is Joe Crawford
Managing Producer is Alycin Bektesh

Increase In Water Rates Is Called For In Future Proposal

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Bloomington Utilities Director Pat Murphy says it’s time to increase water rates. During a staff report this week, Murphy told the Utilities Service Board it is time to look at the increase, even though a similar conversation stalled out last year. He said that they would be revisiting the research that has been done in the past to come forward with a proposal.

Five years ago water rates were increased more than 50 percent to accommodate a second water line to Bloomington’s water treatment plant.  Murphy says there are still infrastructure improvements needed and the profits from water bills will help fund the updates.

At the meeting the board also approved the 2014 interdepartmental agreement between the utility and the City of Bloomington, for the amount of one million five hundred, fourteen thousand dollars, a budget increase of five point five percent.

Standing Room Only – Community Conversation With Law Enforcement

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On January 22nd, the city of Bloomington hosted a community conversation with local law enforcement.  The public was invited to ask questions or make comments to a panel made up of local police. Panelists included representatives of the Bloomington Police Department, the Indiana University Police, the Monroe County Sheriff’s Department and State Police. The event lasted two hours and got very heated at times when speaking of police violence and racial bias.

Prescription Drug Abuse Leads to a Southern Indiana HIV Outbreak

Today, State Health officials are warning of a rapidly spreading outbreak of HIV in the Southeastern portion of Indiana. Officials believe that prescription drug abuse of the injectable opioid Opana (oh-PAWN-uh) is responsible for the majority of 26 reported cases of HIV since mid-december.   According to State Health officials Opana is more potent per milligram than Oxycontin. Health Department Commissioner Jerome Adams issued a statement about the HIV outbreak and the steps being taken to address the problem. Adams said QUOTE “Because prescription drug abuse is at the heart of this outbreak, we are not only working to identify, contact and test individuals who may have been exposed, but also to connect community members to resources for substance abuse treatment and recovery.” To avoid dissemination of HIV, Health Officials recommend that Hoosiers get tested regularly for HIV and avoid high-risk behaviors such as sharing needles and having multiple sexual partners.

 

Interchange – The Prick of Noon: Romeo & Juliet

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We have two guests with us tonight to discuss the play both as production or performance and as text; the deed and the word. As Harold Goddard said, “Drama is a portrayal of human passions eventuating in acts. Poetry is a picture of life in its essence.” Shakespeare toils to mend the two.

In Act One, “The Play’s the Thing,” we’re joined by the director of the IU Theater Production of Romeo & Juliet, Nancy Lipschultz to talk about producing the play for the stage.

In Act Two, “The Prick of Noon,” we’re joined by Ellen MacKay, a scholar of early modern English drama and public culture whose approach to the Shakespearean stage is “driven by the epistemological problems that the theatre poses to a culture eager to draw a clear line between artifice and authenticity.” We discuss Shakespeare’s treatment of time.

We don’t need to withhold any plot points tonight as our subject is a play that was written sometime near the end of the 17th century and like all of Shakespeare’s plays is based on a prior text or two. It’s an ancient plot, warring tribes, political enmity in city-states, and even star-crossed lovers: all nothing new. We can even find Dante referencing historical Montagues and Capulets as feuding political parties in the Purgatory of his Divine Comedy.

And so you know, Romeo and Juliet are always dead before we even begin. It is the outcome that begs a reason why and the play begins with the Prologue giving up our ghosts.

Credits
Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Board Engineer: Jonathan Richardson
Social Media: Carissa Barrett
Executive Producer: Joe Crawford

Senate Bill Calling for Restrictions on Abortion

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An Indiana senate bill could place further restrictions on abortion in the state. Senate Bill 334 would make it illegal to perform an abortion if the decision is based on a fetus’s sex or disability. Writers of the bill say they are trying to prevent discriminatory abortions.

A healthcare provider could face wrongful death and medical malpractice charges if found knowingly performing an abortion for a woman who wants to terminate a pregnancy because of the fetus’ sex or a potential disability.Disabilities specifically mentioned in the bill include scoliosis, Dwarfism, albinism, amelia, Down syndrome and any type of physical or mental disease or disfigurement. Many abortions rights advocates say the bill is troubling.

Betty Cockrum, President and CEO of Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky, said Senate Bill 334 interferes with the sacred doctor-patient relationship.

“It gets government into an arena where it shouldn’t be at all,” Cockrum said.

Cockrum also said that while abortions based on a fetus’s sex may be an issue overseas, it is not a concern in Indiana. But mental health and disabilities are. Cockrum says parents of children with disabilities need help, but she says government funding for disability services would help more than this proposed law.

“The services to families who have developmentally challenged children are underfunded, and if members of the legislature see it fit to impose government intrusion into this decision making, they sure ought to step up and fully fund services,” said Cockrum.

President of Indiana Right to Life, Mike Fichter, did not return a call for comment today. He supports the bill. Fichter was quoted in the Indianapolis Star, saying Indiana Right to Life doesn’t “believe an unborn child should be discriminated against based on disability or sex.” A Senate committee approved the bill last week and it now awaits a vote before the full Senate.

 

Bring It On! – February 23, 2015

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Cornelius Wright and Jacinda Townsend welcome Katherine Wheatle, Victor Borden, and Carl Darnell.

PART ONE
On tonight’s show, Cornelius and Jacinda welcome IU doctoral candidate in Higher Education Katherine Wheatle, Professor of Higher Education & Student Affairs and senior advisor to the IU Executive Vice President for University Academic Affairs Victor Borden, and IU doctoral candidate in Higher Learning & Student Affairs Carl Darnell.

They join the BIO! crew to discuss the challenges and opportunities facing the nation’s Historically Black College’s and Universities (HBCU) in the 21st Century.

PART TWO
Headline news and local calendar events of interest to the African-American community.

CREDITS
Hosts: Cornelius Wright and Jacinda Townsend
Bring It On! is produced by Clarence Boone
Executive Producer Joe Crawford
Our News Editor is Michael Nowlin
Our Board Engineer is Chris Martin

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