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Author Archives: WFHB Archivist

Firehouse Sessions – Iron and Wine

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Sam Beam, better known by his stage name of Iron & Wine, visited the WFHB studios before playing a sold-out show at the Buskirk-Chumley Theater. Over the last two Iron & Wine albums, Beam has expanded his sound with bigger arrangements, dabbling in jazz and R&B, and touring with a twelve-piece band. On this short tour, however, Iron & Wine is back to its roots—just Beam and his acoustic guitar, singing folk songs with gorgeous melodies and deceptively dark lyrics. We discussed his background as a filmmaker and professor, and how listeners take ownership of his songs. Why did he choose the name “Iron & Wine”? “Because Sam Beam sounds kind of lame.” Upon request, Beam performed “Joy,” “Upward Over the Mountain,” and “Love and Some Verses.”

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Books Unbound – Frankenstein, Part 6

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Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley was 18 when she and her husband, Percy Bysshe Shelley, visited some literary friends and got involved in a challenge, to see who could write the most frightening story. Out of a group that included the poet Lord Byron, only Mary’s story of a scientist who goes too far has lasted as a landmark of fantastic literature. Mary Shelley was twenty when the book was published.

Frankenstein was published in 1818, as the Industrial Revolution readied for takeoff in Europe. Science held out the promise of mankind’s triumph over nature, even over death itself – and electricity was the key. In the novel, a doctor uses electricity to re-animate parts of human corpses into a whole, living being – who, although hideous, develops intelligence and self-awareness – and finally turns against its creator. Frankenstein was banned in South Africa in 1955, for containing material deemed “indecent” and “obscene.”

Activate! – Brown Co Humane/Pets Alive: Ingrid Skoog

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Ingrid Skoog, animal lover and long time volunteer with both Brown County Humane and Pets Alive!, talks about the importance of plugging into the community through your passion and the wonder of seeing your service bring results. Also, more volunteer opportunities to use teaching skills here in Bloomington from the Volunteer Network.

Links:
Brown County Humane
Pets Alive Kennel Care
Brown County Humane Society Cat Care at Petco
Run for the Animals 2014

Questions for Governor Pence from Superintendent Glenda Ritz

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Indiana Superintendent Glenda Ritz received more votes in the 2012 election than Governor Mike Pence yet has been stymied by his administration throughout her first term. In fact, speaking to the Bloomington Press Club this afternoon Ritz said during this upcoming legislative session, Pence could sign away the state’s  education budget to a new agency that he created. Her remarks and audience questions are here, in today’s community report.

Daily Local News – September 15, 2014

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Ahead of a statewide launch of the “Moral Mondays” movement in Indianapolis this weekend, Bloomington’s Moral Monday contingent is holding a meeting this evening at 7pm in meeting room one-bee of the Monroe County Public Library; Indiana health officials are reporting an increase in the number of children with respiratory illnesses; Starting October 10, IU’s Grunwald Gallery will be showcasing previously unreleased photographs from artist Robert Mapplethorpe; The Monroe County Community Corrections Department could have dozens of extra clients in the coming year, but not necessarily much more money to serve them;  The Bloomington Board of Public Works is continuing to approve food truck permits while city staff works on new rules for the vendors.

FEATURE
Indiana Superintendent Glenda Ritz received more votes in the 2012 election than Governor Mike Pence yet has been stymied by his administration throughout her first term. In fact, speaking to the Bloomington Press Club this afternoon Ritz said during this upcoming legislative session, Pence could sign away the state’s  education budget to a new agency that he created. Her remarks and audience questions are here, in today’s community report.

ACTIVATE
Now it’s time for Activate, our weekly segment spotlighting people working for positive change in our community.

CREDITS
Anchors: Maria McKinley, Doug Storm
Today’s headlines were written by Alycin Bektesh, David Murphy, Harrison Wagner, and Steven Williamson
Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, a partnership with Community Access Television Services.
Dan Withered produced todays community report
Activate! is produced by Jennifer Whitaker,
Our engineer is Chris Martin,
Joe Crawford is our managing producer
Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh.

Books Unbound – Frankenstein, Part 5

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Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley was 18 when she and her husband, Percy Bysshe Shelley, visited some literary friends and got involved in a challenge, to see who could write the most frightening story. Out of a group that included the poet Lord Byron, only Mary’s story of a scientist who goes too far has lasted as a landmark of fantastic literature. Mary Shelley was twenty when the book was published.

Frankenstein was published in 1818, as the Industrial Revolution readied for takeoff in Europe. Science held out the promise of mankind’s triumph over nature, even over death itself – and electricity was the key. In the novel, a doctor uses electricity to re-animate parts of human corpses into a whole, living being – who, although hideous, develops intelligence and self-awareness – and finally turns against its creator. Frankenstein was banned in South Africa in 1955, for containing material deemed “indecent” and “obscene.”

Stephanie Boyles Griffin: Humane Society of the United States

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In today’s EcoReport feature, Stephanie Boyles Griffin, from the Humane Society of the United States, talks about nonlethal methods to successfully reduce and manage deer populations.

Local organizations receive grants to make Bloomington offically “Bike-Friendly”

Three organizations have received funds from the City of Bloomington to advance bicycle and pedestrian mobility in Bloomington. The Local-Motion grant program is an effort by the city to obtain bike-friendly community status from the League of American Bicyclists. Three thousand dollars were split between Middle Way House, the Bloomington Bike Project and Friends and the Buskirk Chumley Theater for a bike share program, a fellowship and a screening of Breaking Away. A second cycle of Local Motion grant applications will occur next spring.

Military Suicide Prevention Act gains attention during Suicide Prevention Month

The Jacob Sexton Military Suicide Prevention Act authored by Indiana Senator Joe Donnelly is scheduled to receive a full senate hearing this year, but in conjunction with Septembers’ Suicide Prevention Month Donnelly released a statement this week regarding a new report from the Department of Defense. According to the D-O-D in the first quarter of 2014 one hundred and twenty service members committed suicide. The number is right on track with the total number of military suicides in 2013 – which after reevaluation was changed from four hundred and seventy nine to four hundred and seventy five. In his statement, Donnelly said that the majority of assistance goes to those who are active military in their deployment cycle, and that more assistance needs to goes to those to reserve and National Guard members.

Bloomington Beware! – Latest and Not So Greatest

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Scams are everywhere these days! We’ll never be able to completely keep up, but here’s a list of some of the newer ones going around…and around…and around…

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