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Author Archives: WFHB Archivist

Activate! – Hoosier Hills Food Bank: Dan Morelli

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Hoosier Hills Food Bank volunteer Dan Morelli talks about his work with the organization and the upcoming Soup Bowl fundraiser.

Hola Bloomington – January 31, 2014

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Hostess Prisma Lopez-Marin  and Cristy Padilla interview Jose Toledo about his new documentary titled “Unfreedom” and talk about the immigrant Latinos in a mid-western town. Also the EcoReport, the local news and the events of the week.

Volunteer Connection – January 31, 2014

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A weekly snapshot of how people of all ages can match their time and talents to local needs. Each week Volunteer Connection brings you the “featured five” – five ways to get involved NOW! Volunteer Connection is a co-production of WFHB and the City of Bloomington Volunteer Network, working together to build an empowered, vibrant, and engaged community!

IU Researchers Receive Grant to Prove Advantages of Data Mining for Healthcare

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Artificial intelligence in hospitals working with doctors to prescribe treatment sounds like something straight out of the movies. Researchers at the School of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University are working to make this a reality.

The process, which uses data mining and a method called machine learning, could lead the way to a cheaper, better healthcare system. The research being done now is a collaboration of separate research started in 2010. Assistant Professor at IU Kris Hauser is one of the Principal Investigators.

“This was started a few years ago by one of my students who is now a part of this project and he had access to some good data with Centerstone research,” Hauser says, “We got together in my artificial intelligence class and we designed a system to try to recommend when and how much to treat people with mental health disorders. This new project is an attempt to expand that into new clinical domains. That includes cardiology, E.R. readmissions, and to improve the existing application.”

Hauser received his PhD. In Computer Science at Stanford University and won the CAREER award last year from the National Science Foundation.

The research centers mostly around a mathematical framework that can mine existing data to detect patterns. What this means for healthcare is that computers could access a patients complete medical records and suggest a treatment plan that wouldn’t conflict with any past conditions.

One of the obstacles in getting this framework to be effective is the lack of uniformity in hospitals nationwide with their electronic record keeping. Hauser says that until the historical quirks get worked out, they have to work very closely with their data providers to be able to use the data. Once it becomes easier to access the data, the machine learning framework will be able to access more and more data to make more complex treatment plans.

“You can’t really see a pattern unless you have enough data,” Hauser says, “So that’s what the A.I. is trying to do, look at patterns in the data to try and predict how new patients will behave. The more data you get, the more of a complete picture you get of a new patient. While every person is, to some extent, unique, there are some patterns as well in how your disease is progressing and how you might respond to a treatment. The more people we have like you as a patient, the better our predictions will be.

The other Principal Investigator of the research, Sriraam Natarajan, has worked closely with data in the fields of artificial intelligence and its application to bio-medical problems. He explains how this data mining and learning is something we see in our daily lives and that it could easily be harnessed to use in healthcare.

“I think that many people do not clearly see the impact data can have on their day-to-day lives,” Natarajan says, “Of course they see it when Google uses their data to better provide a service, like giving better search results for a movie to watch or a product to buy. I feel that the impact could be similar in terms of healthcare where data can aid in improving the quality of life and treatments, and hopefully lower the costs.”

The goal of the research is not to replace doctors but rather help them in their decision-making. Hauser says the reason this would be so helpful is because doctors don’t always have the time to look at all the data a computer could. In this instance, time is certainly money and Hauser says this research would not only improve the quality of healthcare but also bring down the cost for the patient.

“Our medical system is filled with billions and billions of dollars of wasted opportunities for treating people in a cost-effective way,” Hauser says, “Doctors over-prescribe medicines, they over-prescribe treatments, and they may not be doing the most effect treatments because they may have missed something about a person’s medical history. The information here is to let the doctor make the most informed choice. Doctors already don’t have a lot of time to spend with a patient and the medical history. This has the opportunity to digest the information for them and present it in a user-friendly way, then we have to see a better outcome.”

The research just received a $686,000 grant from the National Science Foundation. The grant will help the researchers work towards trying out the intelligent computer frameworks on real patients in a real hospital setting.

“This provides the opportunity to save money, even in a single-disease scenario,” Hauser says, “Clinical depression, for example, is a multi-billion dollar industry. If we even save one percent of costs, this is paying back the investment many, many times over.”

Books Unbound – Lady Chatterley’s Lover, Part 12

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Born in 1885, David Herbert Lawrence was an English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, and painter. His collective works are classified as a reflection of the dehumanizing effects of modernity and industrialization. His marriage in 1914 to Frieda Weekly, a woman who left her husband and three children for Lawrence, provided inspiration and emotional support for his literary career. Lawrence died in 1930, reaching his peak of fame posthumously.

Banned by U.S. Customs (1929). Banned in Ireland (1932), Poland (1932), Australia (1959), Japan (1959), India (1959). Banned in Canada (1960) until 1962. Dissemination of Lawrence’s novel has been stopped in China (1987) because the book “will corrupt the minds of young people and is also against the Chinese tradition.” Lady Chatterley’s Lover was the object of numerous obscenity trials in both the UK and the United States up into the 1960s.

Lady Chatterley’s Lover, first published privately in 1928, was not published openly in Britain until 1960. It tells the story of the love affair between Constance (Lady Chatterley) and her husband Clifford’s gamekeeper, Oliver Mellors, while exploring the nature of relationships between men and women. Besides the evident sexual content of the book, “Chatterley” spurred controversy for its discussion of the British social class system and social conflict. Penguin, the publisher of the unexpurgated text in 1960, was unsuccessfully tried for violation of the 1959 Obscene Publications Act. The prosecutor was ridiculed for asking, “Is this the kind of book you would wish your wife or servants to read?”

Westville Correctional Facility Hunger Strike

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Last week, prisoners at the Westville Correctional Facility in Westville, Indiana staged a hunger strike and mass-call, in response to the transition last Fall from hot lunches to cold sack lunches. The mass-call succeeded in alerting prison officials to the prisoners’ dissatisfaction, and the facility has now switched back to hot lunches. Now, family members of Westville prisoners are claiming that the heat has been turned off in sections of the prison housing prisoners who participated in the strike. WFHB correspondent Lauren Glapa spoke with Westville Public Information Officer John Schrader about what he knows, and with an organizer from the group Indiana Prisoner Solidarity who chose the pseudonym Jesse Smith, for today’s WFHB feature exclusive.

EcoReport – Senator Mark Stoops: Senate Bill 398

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In today’s EcoReport feature, Indiana State Senator Mark Stoops talks about the newly proposed Senate Bill 398, Indiana’s Bicentennial Wilderness Act.

EcoReport – January 30, 2014

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In today’s EcoReport feature, Indiana State Senator Mark Stoops talks about the newly proposed Senate Bill 398, Indiana’s Bicentennial Wilderness Act.

EcoReport is a weekly program providing independent media coverage of environmental and ecological issues with a focus on local, state and regional people, issues, and events in order to foster open discussion of human relationships with nature and the Earth and to encourage you to take personal responsibility for the world in which we live. Each program features timely eco-related headline news, a feature interview or event recording, and a calendar of events of interest to the environmentally conscious.

CREDITS
Anchors: Kristen Troxel and Kelly Miller
This week’s news stories were written by Drew Daudelin, Linda Greene, Norm Holy, David Murphy, Stephanie Stewart. This week’s feature was engineered by Dan Young. This week’s calendar was compiled by Kristina Wiltsee. Our broadcast engineer is Dan Withered. Producers for EcoReport are Kelly Miller and Dan Young. Executive producer is Alycin Bektesh.

Bloomington Beware! – Top Ten Scams: Part 1

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Our weekly consumer watchdog segment Bloomington Beware!

Daily Local News – January 29, 2014

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Yesterday the proposed marriage amendment House Joint Resolution Three passed in the Indiana House for the third time; A bill has been introduced to the Indiana House of Representatives to shield the state’s agricultural industry from state environmental regulations; The Ellettsville Town Council began to flesh out the job description for a proposed town manager January 27th; The Bloomington Board of Public Works approved a walkway project at what a city engineer said is one of the most dangerous intersections in town for pedestrians.

FEATURE
The State of the Union
President Obama opened last night’s State of the Union Address by declaring his determination to strengthen the American middle class, and stating that he would not hesitate to use executive orders if legislation fails. We bring you a portion of his speech for today’s WFHB feature report.

BLOOMINGTON BEWARE
Our weekly consumer watchdog segment Bloomington Beware!

CREDITS
Anchors: Cathi Norton, Kelly Wherley
Today’s headlines were written by David Murphy and Alycin Bektesh,
Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, in partnership with Community Access Television services.
Bloomington Beware was produced by Richard Fish,
Ilze Akerbergs produced our feature.
Our engineer today is Jim Lang,
Editor is Drew Daudelin,
Executive Producer is Alycin Bektesh.

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