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Author Archives: WFHB Archivist

Voices in the Street – McBloomington: Restricting Chain Stores Downtown

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Bloomington Mayor Mark Kruzan is planning another attempt to limit the number of chain restaurants downtown.  The mayor says he wants the City Council and the Plan Commission to approve an ordinance that would require an applicant wanting to open a standardized restaurant in two districts to seek conditional approval from the city’s Board of Zoning Appeals.  The Greater Bloomington Chamber of Commerce announced their opposition to the proposal yesterday, so how do you feel?  Should we restrict what kinds of business can operate downtown?

EcoReport – Ralph Keeling: Scripps Institute

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In today’s EcoReport feature, Ralph Keeling, professor at the Scripps Institute at the University of California – San Diego, discusses problems related to global carbon levels and climate.

“Not So Fast” Food: Mayor Attempts Limits on New Downtown Chain Restaurants

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Bloomington Mayor Mark Kruzan is planning another attempt to limit the number of chain restaurants downtown. The mayor says he wants the City Council and the Plan Commission to approve an ordinance that would require an applicant wanting to open a standardized restaurant in two districts of the downtown to seek conditional approval from the city’s Board of Zoning Appeals. The city defines a standardized restaurant as one which is contractually required by a franchisor to offer standardized menus, ingredients, food preparation, uniforms, logos, or exterior design. Mayor Kruzan offers a hypothetical question to listeners, to justify his proposal.

There are eleven conditional use ordinance provisions for development standards that the Zoning Board can use to evaluate applications for such things as historic preservation, bed and breakfast businesses, some restaurants, and adult care and child care facilities, plus other regulations applying to signage, building height, density, and architectural standards. Mayor Kruzan says the homogenization of the character of downtown Bloomington is not in the community’s interests. He responds to anticipated critics of his proposal, and the expected argument that his proposal limits property owners rights and is an unwarranted intervention in the free market.

Mayor Kruzan says that most communities have development regulations that reflect the priorities of their respective community. Furthermore, the proposed regulations would only apply to two districts: courthouse square and restaurant row. The mayor acknowledges that the desire to make the downtown area and its restaurants unique is part of the larger promotion of the city’s art and entertainment offerings, reflected in the city’s recent designation of the downtown BEAD district. However, the proposed ordinance could not be applied to the BEAD, as it is not a legal district. Mayor Kruzan concluded by outlining the expected process and timeline for his proposal to become law.

The mayor says that there could be as many as six public hearings for the public to attend. The Greater Bloomington Chamber of Commerce announced their opposition to the proposal today, stating that the ordinance would restrict ‘standardized’ restaurants from locating in some portions of the downtown.

Brown County Hour – Episode #24

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Hosted by Dave Seastrom and Vera Grubbs.

First aired Sunday, March 2, 2014 at 9 AM on WFHB.

☆ In this episode of the Brown County Hour:

Vera Grubbs interviews artist Mary Pendergrass
WoodWatch segment: a report on a Meet Your Legislators meeting at the County Building regarding the DNR logging plan
Rich Reardin talks about the upcoming Brown County Playhouse concert and documentary on the life and music of Irish folksinger Eunan Mc Intyre
The Artist Colony Inn Players with a teaser for their ongoing murder mysteries
Poems by Rick Fettig and Gunther Flumm
Dave Seastrom with another pithy essay: Cabin Fever
And our Musical Guests: The Whipstitch Sallies.

✇ Theme music by Slats Klug & Friends.

Daily Local News – March 5, 2014

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Bloomington Mayor Mark Kruzan is planning another attempt to limit the number of chain restaurants downtown; The economic divide between the so-called one percent and the other ninety-nine has been growing across the country, and even more so in Indiana according to a new study from The Indiana Institute for Working Families; Republican Indiana State Senator Brandt Hershman is proposing an amendment to House Bill 1001 that would prohibit same-sex couples from filing a joint-tax-return.

FEATURE
Planned Neighborhood Development
The city council will meet tonight to discuss a proposal to re-zone a football-shaped area of land along the B-line trail on the north side of the downtown area between 9th and 11th streets. The proposal, brought the council by local non-profit Habitat for Humanity, is to re-zone the area from residential to “planned neighborhood development”, so that Habitat for Humanity can build a subdivision with 35 single family homes. Currently, the land, which is owned by habitat for humanity, is zoned so that 50% of the trees on the property can be removed, but if the proposal is approved, Habitat for Humanity would be allowed to remove up to 64% of the trees on the land. The proposal states that the 36% of the property that would be required to remain wooded would be near the B-line trail and the railroad that borders the other side of the property. The area was clear as recently as the 1960s and the oldest trees on the property are the ones near the edges, which the proposal plans to retain. At the last city council meeting, residents of the area spoke out against Habitat’s proposal for a variety of rationales, ranging from the ecology of the area, to the view from the b-line trail. WFHB Correspondent Lauren Glapa spoke with Patrick Shay, development review manager for the city of Bloomington, and Martha Crouch, a resident of the neighborhood for 35 years, for today’s WFHB feature.

BLOOMINGTON BEWARE
Scammers have reached a new low, by victimizing the neediest people – the homeless. So far, this frightening scheme is apparently NOT illegal — so it’s up to you to help spread the warning. That’s on a new edition of our consumer watchdog segment Bloomington Beware!

CREDITS
Anchors: Cathi Norton, Kelly Wherley
Today’s headlines were written by David Murphy and Neal Earley
Bloomington Beware was produced by Richard Fish with correspondent Anson Shupe
Lauren Glapa produced our feature.
Our engineer is Jim Lang,
Our Editor is Drew Daudelin,
Executive Producer is Alycin Bektesh.

Planned Neighborhood Development

Play

The city council will meet tonight to discuss a proposal to re-zone a football-shaped area of land along the B-line trail on the north side of the downtown area between 9th and 11th streets. The proposal, brought the council by local non-profit Habitat for Humanity, is to re-zone the area from residential to “planned neighborhood development”, so that Habitat for Humanity can build a subdivision with 35 single family homes. Currently, the land, which is owned by habitat for humanity, is zoned so that 50% of the trees on the property can be removed, but if the proposal is approved, Habitat for Humanity would be allowed to remove up to 64% of the trees on the land. The proposal states that the 36% of the property that would be required to remain wooded would be near the B-line trail and the railroad that borders the other side of the property. The area was clear as recently as the 1960s and the oldest trees on the property are the ones near the edges, which the proposal plans to retain. At the last city council meeting, residents of the area spoke out against Habitat’s proposal for a variety of rationales, ranging from the ecology of the area, to the view from the b-line trail. WFHB Correspondent Lauren Glapa spoke with Patrick Shay, development review manager for the city of Bloomington, and Martha Crouch, a resident of the neighborhood for 35 years, for today’s WFHB feature.

Bloomington Beware! – Homeless Phone Scam

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Scammers have reached a new low, by victimizing the neediest people – the homeless. So far, this frightening scheme is apparently NOT illegal — so it’s up to you to help spread the warning.

Ins and Outs of Money – FAFSA

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Thinking about college? Ashley talks with Patt McCafferty, Director of Financial Aid at Ivy Tech Community College, about the importance of filing a FAFSA.

St. Monkey: A New Book by IU Prof. Jacinda Townsend

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Jacinda Townsend grew up in South-Central Kentucky and has published short fiction in literary magazines such as African Voices, Carve Magazine, The Maryland Review, and Xavier Review. Her work has been anthologized in publications like Surreal South and Telling Stories: Fiction by Kentucky
Feminists. She is currently a professor at Indiana University and resides in Bloomington with her two kids. On a recent episode of the WFHB show Bring it On Townsend talked about her new book, St. Monkey, which is set in Eastern Kentucky during the 1950’s. Now we bring you a portion of that appearance, for today’s WFHB feature report.

Daily Local News – March 4, 2014

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The Bloomington Plan Commission voted February 24th to fast-track approval for a thirty-five home subdivision in what is currently an urban forest along the B-Line Trail; Senator Joe Donnelly received the announcement on February 28th that a state of emergency in Indiana has been extended to March fifteenth, due to extremely cold weather affecting propane supply; Indiana University plans to partner in the creation of a Chicago-based Digital Lab for Manufacturing; The Indiana Chapter of an organization called Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America is fighting the passage of Senate Bill 229.

FEATURE
St. Monkey: A New Book by IU Prof. Jacinda Townsend
Jacinda Townsend grew up in South-Central Kentucky and has published short fiction in literary magazines such as African Voices, Carve Magazine, The Maryland Review, and Xavier Review. Her work has been anthologized in publications like Surreal South and Telling Stories: Fiction by Kentucky
Feminists. She is currently a professor at Indiana University and resides in Bloomington with her two kids. On a recent episode of the WFHB show Bring it On Townsend talked about her new book, St. Monkey, which is set in Eastern Kentucky during the 1950’s. Now we bring you a portion of that appearance, for today’s WFHB feature report.

INS AND OUTS OF MONEY
Thinking about college? Ashley talks with Patt McCafferty, Director of Financial Aid at Ivy Tech Community College, about the importance of filing a FAFSA.

CREDITS
Anchors: Casey Kuhn, Nick Tumino
Today’s headlines were written by Lindsey Wright,
Along with Joe Crawford for CATSweek, a partnership with Community Access Television Services.
Our feature was produced by Rob Powell.
The Ins and Outs of Money is produced by Dan Withered, in partnership with the Monroe County Public Library and The United Way of Monroe County. Our engineer today is Rob Powell,
Editor is Drew Daudelin, Executive Producer is Alycin Bektesh.

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